The Woodshop Shed

adventures in woodworking and home maintenance, from my shop in an oversized backyard shed

August 2019
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Sculptulated

Furnished content.
(from Lumberjocks.com)


SculptulatedStarted a new Rosewood sculpted piece this morning. This one will be about 25” tall when complete.
The base is wenge and the finish is spray lacquerSeveral people have asked what I use to do the shaping. Well, here it is…my Makiita variable speed grinder with a rubber backing pad and a sanding disc.
This created a LOT of sawdust. I have a downdraft table, 2 squirrel cage dust filters and also use a trend air shield pro. My sanding area is an enclosed 5×10' area of my shop.



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posted at: 12:00am on 07-Aug-2019
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Coffee Table Cabinet

Furnished content.
(from Lumberjocks.com)


Coffee Table CabinetThis was built entirely of reclaimed wood, primarily from pallets (hence the random nail holes), except for a birch plywood base inside the cabinet. Species are approximate, because I don't know the provenance of the wood, but my best guesses are oak for the frame and the door stiles and rails and tabletop banding, basswood for the inset panels and and unknown hardwood for the table top. Corrections and educated guesses are welcome!I don't yet have a jointer, so I jointed edges on a table saw sled and planed heavily with a thickness planer. When I say “heavily” I mean I had about 50 gallons of chips when I was done.I'm a relative novice, and this was the first project in which I used mortise and tenon joinery. I built a table saw jig to make the tenons and I built a router jig to make the mortises. Other than cutting too deep (all the way through!) on my first mortise, I didn't have any difficulties. I chose to round off the tenons with sandpaper rather than chisel out the mortises. I used a slot bit for the frames and rabbeted down the inset basswood panels to fit into the slots.The hardware is all junk shop finds except for new magnet catches (hidden).I stained the basswood to better match the rest of the wood, but didn't stain anything else. It's finished with polyurethane, which I applied with a Wagner spray gun I had but had never used for fine finishing before. THAT was a revelation after having brushed on finishes for years! I'm not 100% happy with how red some of the oak (stile/rail) is in contrast to the other wood, but it wasn't that red before finishing, and fortunately the contrast is not as pronounced in the house as it is in bright sun in the driveway.Lessons learned: Double-check and triple-check the depth setting on the plunge base when routing mortises. Test finish on scraps from EVERY part of a build. I need more clamps. A lot more clamps.



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Dotti Kogei -

Furnished content.
(from Lumberjocks.com)


Dotti Kogei -   So, we've got to the first of the 'boxes' – Dotti Kogei, that I entered in the Box Category of this year's 2019 Western Australia Out Of The Woods competition.This box, or is at a chest of drawers, was inspired by Japanese woodworker Suda Kenji. He has the status of a 'Living National Treasure' - Holder of an Important Intangible Cultural Property, Moku-kogei (Fine Woodwork). He is an exceptional 'Fine Woodworker' with his own gallery and studio in the small town of Ganura-cho, in the Gunma Prefecture of Japan. Check it out here. You will quickly see where I got my inspiration from I had the privilege of meeting Suda san and visiting his gallery and workshop in May 2019 - a truly memorable experience.Suda-san describes his work as kogei - art crafts, though there is no real translation. Kogei is a uniquely Japanese term that brings together a whole range of western concepts that embrace traditional woodwork, creativity, art, craft, and artistic expression. The word is used to categories items which though they have a function, are intrinsically 'beautiful things', which goes well beyond their utility value. You will see this in all Suda-sans boxes - traditional western style hinged lids are absent in his work.My Kogie box is presented in a typical Japanese Tsutsumi, gift wrapped fashion. It is offered in a paulownia (kiri) wooden outer storage box, called a Tomobako, or Kiribako.The engraved wooden panel on the top, written in Japanese Kanji characters, has the title of the contents, my name, together with where and when it was made.Dotti Kogei
Kogei :
Box / Small chest of drawers : /
Made by :
Martin Burgoyne :
Jarrahdale WA :
September 2018 to March 2019 : 20189 20193 As well as its outer Tamobako, my kogei box is also gift wrapped to add more 'suspense' and mystery to what lies inside. A traditional Furoshiki fabric square, sewn by my wife, is used for the 'gift' wrapping.The Tamobako and Furoshiki cover are both tied with traditional Japanese Sanada Himo cotton tapes.So, to the actual 'box'. It sits on a decorative tray made from Rosewood and walnut, with inlays of lace wood, together with shell and opal dots, a theme that goes across all elements of the box. The 'box' is in fact two small chests of drawers that can be locked together by traditional Japanese spring locks. Once unlocked the two chests of drawers can be separated, turned around and placed back on the tray so that the drawers are accessible.They can also be taken off the tray so that it can be used separately, or as a place for the contents of drawers.The two chests of drawers have book matched burr elm veneers with highlights of rosewood and lace wood. A black banding sprinkled with gold dust, and with inlays of shell and opal dots surrounds the two chests of drawers. The inside is veneered with maple.The five internal drawers are made of lime and have gold dust sprinkled interiors - a change from my usual goat suede. They continue the black banding theme of the outside of the chests, with shell, opal and gold dust inlays on their fronts.The drawer knobs are made of opal cabochons mounted in sliver claw settings - they are actually stud earrings! Thedrawers are jointed using tiny biscuits, unlike Suda-sans secret mitered dovetails….......As I often do in my work, there is a separate 'hidden' box inside. This small box, 'hidden' at the back of the largest drawer, matches the main chests, with similar book matched burr elm veneers, lace wood bandings and a black banding with gold dust highlights and shell and opal dots. It is lined with blue goat skin suede, to match the outer Furoshiki fabric.In typical Japanese woodworking fashion, there are no visible joints. A feature used in western woodwork, often to demonstrate our prowess as craftsmen, but frowned upon in Japanese woodwork!!I'm in my Japanese period a the moment and have moved away from the marquetry that I so enjoyed doing in past years. A comment in Suda-sans book about using the natural beauty of the wood, rather too much vulgar decoration made me re-think as well ….....Why Dotti Kogei? Its name is derived from the shell and opal 'dots' which bring the different elements of this kogei box together, and of course my wife's first name is Dorothy!If you are wondering, yes it came first in the Box category in this years Western Australia Wood Show. Check it out here. My usual rival in the Box category knocked me down to 2nd place the last two years, which prompted me to raise my game - so thanks DT.I hope you enjoyed looking at it, as much as I enjoyed making it. Can't wait to start the next Japanese style 'box'!!



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