The Woodshop Shed

adventures in woodworking and home maintenance, from my shop in an oversized backyard shed

January 2024
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Removing Mildew Stains on Wood

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(from WoodNet.net)


Hello! I have some mildew spots staining a few things like the legs of my work bench, etc. Any tips on how to remove the stains short of sanding?

Thank you.

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posted at: 12:00am on 31-Jan-2024
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Moisture problem in new shop!

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(from WoodNet.net)


I have a moisture issue that I can not figure out.

Some background first -

The slab was poured in July of 2022.
The all metal building in September of 2022.
The foam was sprayed in October of 2022.

Once the overhead door was up, I used propane heaters to heat the space.
I stripped the building out with 2x4's and hung drywall in December of 2022 and January of 2023.

In February of 2023 once the electrical was installed, I switch to a 220 electric space heat with the propane as supplemental heat.
I started running a dehumidifier and was emptying it twice a day. I know the propane put a lot of moisture into the air but with emptying the bucket twice a day, I was taking out about 1 3/4 gallons a day! I bought a hygrometer when I started to use the dehumidifier and the relative humidity was almost 85%!
Eek It never did rain! Whew.

Using the dehumidifier brought that number down to around 70%. I wasn't really worried because I assumed that going through the summer and using the air conditioner would bring that number down further and it did to a little under 60%. Not bad.

I quit using the dehumidifier and now into this heating cycle and the number went back to 70%!
So I started it back up and empty it about 1 1/2 times a day. The number is back down to 60% but no lower.
One day I was gone and the RH went back up 2%!

WHERE IS THE MOISTURE COMING FROM???

The concrete has been poured almost 16 months so I would think that it is fully cured and no moisture coming from it.
The building is on a slope lot so the slab has approximately 2 1/2' of pea gravel under one end and 1' under the other end.
The gravel and the fact that the concrete is not wet tells me that no water is coming through the concrete.
For the framing lumber, I used kiln dried pine and once again, I would think any moisture in that component is gone.
I assume that the foam might have a water component but after well over a year and using the AC and dehumidifier, wouldn't that moisture have off gassed?
I do not store any quantity of lumber in the shop - green or otherwise.
I do use water based finish but I haven't sprayed anything in quite a while and even then I exhaust the over spray outside.

I found an absolute humidity calculator online and it had 9 pounds of water in the shop volume with and RH of 60% and a temp of 62F. That surely can't be right since I am removing close to that much every day. I must have made a mistake.

I have racked my brain and tried to think of every contingency and I have got nothing.
I have asked friends family and once again nothing.

What does the Woodnet brain trust say???

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posted at: 12:00am on 29-Jan-2024
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A good woodworking school in the Northeast

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(from WoodNet.net)


Hi All,

I got laid off last spring and decided to retire. The company that laid me off will provide $2500 in tuition assistance for any career-based retraining I'd like. I have 30+ years of experience woodowrkig mostly with power tools, but I'd
like to hone up on my hand skills: planes, chisels, sharpening etc. Can anyone recommend a decent school for shorter-term courses?

Thanks,

Dave

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posted at: 12:00am on 27-Jan-2024
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Shop Organization

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(from WoodNet.net)


Well, it ain't fine woodworking but I'm going to share this anyway. Just a little shop organization I finished this weekend, inspired by Ikea. Haven't had much time to build anything the last couple of years so this was at least some quality shop time with assist from my son+his new puppy. Now its timeto fill all my bins up with junk that had been collecting in this rats nest of a corner at my miter saw station.

.jpg  1.JPG (Size: 96.13 KB / Downloads: 237)
.jpg  2.JPG (Size: 156.03 KB / Downloads: 237)

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posted at: 12:00am on 25-Jan-2024
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Woodworking Calculator


Feet Inches /
Add/Subtract
Enter a measurement in feet, inches, fraction
Click + or -
Enter another measurement in feet, inches, fraction
Click =

Multiply/Divide
Enter a measurement in feet, inches, fraction
Click X or /
Enter a number in the X / Box
Click =


posted at: 2:47pm on 23-Jan-2024
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Sketchup Free Cutlist?

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(from WoodNet.net)


Is there a cutlist extension for Sketchup free? if not, can I export a Sketchup free model into Sketchup Make 2017 and use that cutlist?

Thanks,
Stone

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posted at: 12:00am on 23-Jan-2024
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Cabinet Design Help . . .

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(from WoodNet.net)


I'm trying to design a modification of Bourbon Moth's giant cabinets.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NX6FBYHyLrw

He's got four carcasses, each with one drawer on the bottom and doors at the top, with a quarter inch ply back behind the doors. For the drawer, he put a 3/4 panel at the back, to which he attached blum undermount slides.

I want mine to look pretty much the same, except a total of 74" tall, and I want two drawers at the bottom. My thought is to make each of the four sections in two pieces: a lower piece, 30" high with two drawers, and then an upper piece sitting on top with the doors and shelves behind it. face frame. But I'm not sure how to mount the undermount slides for the upper drawer. I know I can use side mount Accurides by adding a filler to accomodate for the face frame, but I'd like to stick with blum undermount.

Is the easy answer to just use a 3/4 ply panel for the back and affix the slide for the top drawer the same way I do for the bottom? Am I missing something better that would not use up so much 3/4 ply?

Thanks in advance. sorry, my sketchup skills aren't good enough yet to post a picture of what I'm talking about, but I think it's pretty straightforward.

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posted at: 12:00am on 21-Jan-2024
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Shooting Board Fence Repair

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(from WoodNet.net)


Through use the fence on my shooting board has been eaten away a bit and I am getting some blow-out on the back of the boards I am squaring. How do I fix this? I am guessing I can insert some kind of sacrificial piece that can be replaced as it wears. What do you think?

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posted at: 12:00am on 19-Jan-2024
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Wood processing plant

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posted at: 12:00am on 17-Jan-2024
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Outfeed Table Redesign Ideas

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(from WoodNet.net)


Hello All!

My current outfeed table is large, has drawers and does double duty as a router table and storage. Space is getting tight and I am thinking about downsizing, but I still need a router table... Any good ideas out there for such a thing?

Thank you!

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posted at: 12:00am on 14-Jan-2024
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A Clock of my own design

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(from WoodNet.net)


I have gone down the rabbit hole, an obsession my wife would say, to builda clock of my own design. My wife also hates the tick-tock of typical mechanical clocks with pendulums, or similar timing mechanisms, so my primary objective was that whatever I build had to be very quiet. During my investigations into different escapement mechanisms I found that one called the grasshopper is exceeding quiet. It was developed by John Harrison, a brilliant English clock maker who developed the first clock that could keep time accurately at see, which solved the longitude problem that had plagued sailers since man started sailing across the open ocean. Harrison started as a woodworker, so there's hope for the rest of us wood butchers.

If you see a clock with a grasshopper movement you'll see it's very unique. It's also not obvious how to design andmake that movement. Fortunately, Harrison wrote it down, more or less, and others have studied and interpreted his work so that us mortals can draw or calculatethe key dimensions required for any particular size and number of teeth on the escape wheel. I built a grasshopper movement and escape wheel just to see if my design actually worked. I was amazed that it worked just as it's supposed to.


With that confidence boost, I set about to design the rest of the drive train of the clock. I built a prototype, and then a second prototype to work out both the design and some technical challenges. I had planned to use a typical weight drive and rewind system, but some what turned out to be unrelated problems, pushed me towards using an endless rope (remontoire, for those who might know about clocks) mechanism. With the design I developed the remontoire weight drops nearly 12"/hour, so it would need to be rewound at least every 6 hours. Well that's no good, so I incorporated an automatic rewind system that lifts the weight about once per hour. This is done with a small motor, a relay, and two limit switches tripped by the weight, one to turn the motor on, the other to turn it off.

I built the clock from walnut plywood that I made from shop sawn veneer. The wheels are machined from cast acrylic and the pinions from cherry plywood. The grasshopper itself was solid cherry. Most parts were cut on my CNC, some several times to get them right. Lots of handwork to fit shafts, bushings, alignment pins, and all manner of other pieces. All in I must have somewhere around 300 hours in this, making it the longest woodworking related project ever.

I used acrylic for the escape wheel because the one I made from plywood would always chip out on the tips of some of the teeth, and precise trips are key to the grasshopper working.

The acrylic machines so beautifully that I decided to use it for all the wheels.

Thanks for your patience. Here's the clock.


What a great project. And, yes, it's incredibly quiet, any background noise makes it silent.

John

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posted at: 12:00am on 13-Jan-2024
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Pretty good carving

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Snake walking stick

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posted at: 12:00am on 13-Jan-2024
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Couple little projects

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(from WoodNet.net)


I used up most of my leftover mesquite on this little shelf. Many example of this little shelf on the innwerwebs, most with a tile or photo in the 'window'. LOML will knock out a cross stitch to put in there soon. Only finish is WATCO natural, because I have a mesquite tall clock from many years back finished the same way (want them to be similar).


.jpg  shelf.jpg (Size: 791.45 KB / Downloads: 176)

And here's a little mantel clock, because I've been carrying around three of those dial faces and two chiming movements for probably 20 years... and I had some nice enough QSWO for the case. A little disappointed that you have be right up on it to see the fleck. No glass, but I'd put a door on any more going forward. I have a more appropriate rectangle 'Arts & Crafts' dial face to use the last movement on, and will get to that when the snow clears up (need wood).


.jpg  clock.jpg (Size: 899.72 KB / Downloads: 177)

Both fun little projects. Ebony plugs on both. Still working with a grab-bag of ebony shorts I picked up at Woodcraft probably 20 years ago as well. Thanks for looking...

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posted at: 12:00am on 11-Jan-2024
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Way to cut bead profile manually on cabinet face frame

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(from WoodNet.net)


Looking for a suggestion on how to manually cut a bead profile on cabinet face frame that is already installed. I am pulling overlay doors off and keeping carcasses in place so not to disturb granite. I don't see an easy way to remove existing face frames without causing damage to carcasses, will build new doors installed as inset doors. I would like to add the beading detail that would help define the openings a bit more.

Any ideas would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks in advance

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posted at: 12:00am on 11-Jan-2024
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Nut & Saddle Sanding Tool

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(from WoodNet.net)


Another luthier tool for those who might be interested in stringed instrument construction. Not sure if this could be useful for another job, especially if it is scaled up.



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posted at: 12:00am on 09-Jan-2024
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An Urn for My MIL

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(from WoodNet.net)


I didn't think I had any pictures, but I found this one while looking for something else. My MIL passed away in November. She had mentioned some time ago that she wanted me to make the urn. Her only other request was it be made of walnut. This is the design I came up with.This picture is before sanding andapplying the finish.The lid was my first 4 corner turning. Those corners spinning made me nervous, butitis something I've been wanting to do for a while. I did not get pictures of it finished, the timeframe was pretty tight. Gluing the compound miter corners was a challenge. I have some picture frame clamps that I was able to use to hold the corners square, and then put strap clamps around the whole thing.

https://share.icloud.com/photos/02bpxjCY...Wqj1VuRNCA

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posted at: 12:00am on 09-Jan-2024
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9 Weird Woodworking Tricks That Actually Work!

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(from Sawdust Etc.)


I've read a lot of woodworking tips and tricks online, so much so, that it seems like I'm not seeing any new ones.So I set out to make a useful collection of tricks that aren't the typical ones you see online.I hope you enjoy these and pick up at least one tip you haven't seen before.

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posted at: 12:00am on 08-Jan-2024
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How to Price Your Woodwork. A Simple Technique.

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(from Sawdust Etc.)


Lots of woodworkers will be familiar with the YouTube videos of David Picciutto. His distinctive style and straight-talking make him an interesting and endearing character to watch. There are a million ways to price your woodwork.In this video David outlines what he believes in regard to pricing, and why. You can't argue with that.

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posted at: 12:00am on 08-Jan-2024
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Takumi Woodwork Show How Japanese Style Woodworking Should Be Done

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(from Sawdust Etc.)


We all know Japanese joinery is just wonderful, but what happens when two British guys base their woodworking business on this style of work?

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posted at: 12:00am on 08-Jan-2024
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FWW Flash Drive

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(from WoodNet.net)


I've sold my shop (or almost everything) and getting ready tomove. I have to downsize from a roll top desk to my secretary and found a FWW archive 1975 - 2015 which I have no more use. Anyone wanting it, let me know. I'll even spring for the postage.

Happy new year long lost friends!

Jim

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posted at: 11:39am on 07-Jan-2024
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Drop down outlets

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Am I losing my mind or do I remember a time when you could find an outlet that would hang from the ceiling? Maybe I'm thinking of an air line and not electric?
Confused

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posted at: 11:39am on 07-Jan-2024
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Stair Railing

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(from WoodNet.net)


My wife's christmas present was replacing the builder grade stair mismatched stair railings with something custom. The railings and newel post are walnut. The balusters are poplar. Hopefully the links work. It is not easy to share photos here. With the file size limits if I download them and try toput them in as attachments I have to resize them all to fit under the size limits. I used my 3D printer as part of this project. Mostly because I could I modeled and printed angle gauges to make sure I got all the angles correct. I built the assembly with the newel post andbalusters before I installed it.


railing and balusters. I still need to put poly on the walnut.
https://share.icloud.com/photos/01cUcJkD...qnbozh-urQ

newel post detail
https://share.icloud.com/photos/032F9tiO...M2tisaKwAQ

hand rail, after removing the old rail and patching and painting the wall. I still need to stain and put poly on this rail.
https://share.icloud.com/photos/08a8U58e...t-QUW2a1nQ

the entire project.
https://share.icloud.com/photos/0bdYr4ly...JhosJ4sHvA

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posted at: 11:39am on 07-Jan-2024
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