The Woodshop Shed

adventures in woodworking and home maintenance, from my shop in an oversized backyard shed

May 2019
Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
     
 


Early 1960's Ford Thames Trader Recovery Vehicle - Tow Truck

Furnished content.
(from Lumberjocks.com)


Early 1960's Ford Thames Trader Recovery Vehicle - Tow TruckEarly 1960's Ford Thames Trader Recovery Vehicle – Tow Truck…Firstly let me say a HUGE AUSSIE THANK YOU to Ralph who has inspired this build with his Tow Trucks https://www.lumberjocks.com/projects/409046
It was through his generosity of sharing his “how I built it photos” that I found a tow truck in his collection, what looked like a matchbox toy I had when a child [which I actually found when I went searching].The actual matchbox toy off the internetAnd look what I did to mine.The Ford Thames Trader but upon first look I was sure, it was way too difficult to make as a play toy.
Well some 50 plus hours later, I've proved myself wrong, a scratch built toy tow truck.
At 18” long x 7” wide x 8.5” high it's a little heavy at 11lbs.
The winch/crane works.
The doors open.The bonnet is from a laminated Merbau post,
The cabin is a mixture of Red Gum and Spotted Gum,
The rear of the truck is American Walnut,
Te crane is Spotted Gum,
The detailing is Blackheart Sassafras [front & rear bumper bars + wheel arches & fuel tanks].
Finish is my home made Wipe On Poly 3 coats; 30% Tung Oil, 40% Satin Clear Polyurethane, 30% Turps.A couple of other THANK YOU acknowledgements:
The Dutch Wooden Button steering wheel,
The Ducky spring loaded lock mechanism on the crane winch.The truck has had it's first test run with the grandsons with the only modification required being the size of the pickup on the end of the winch rope [it's too small for some of the other trucks/vehicles I've made]All in all a fun, challenging project which extended me in a good way….



Read more here

posted at: 12:00am on 25-May-2019
path: /Woodworking | permalink | edit (requires password)

Comments:
0 comments, click here to add the first



Planing stop - for one wild shaving horse

Furnished content.
(from Lumberjocks.com)


Planing stop - for one wild shaving horsePlaning stop
for one wild shaving horseThis is my version of a classic old planing stop. These stops can be found in different forms – back in early scripts and even found archaeological excavations, here in Europe.This post is for you Don W , since you mentioned it, in your comment, I thought I would post it for inspiration. Smiles.It's made from a piece of car coil spring, simply forged flat in one end, and as a square nail in the other – teeth cut and then bend.Works perfectly fine, I made it for use on my one wild shaving horse and to bring into nature, to be used on a splitted log, as a primitive workbench hold, but have only tested it on the workbench, in the shop.
At the shaving horse, I'll simply make a hole and bang it in, then raise or lower by beating under or over.
Simple as can be.
Pictures:
1. The planning stop in action.
2. Testing the stop..
3. The shape.

Hope it can be to some inspiration, perhaps even some stops.Best thoughts,MaFe



Read more here

posted at: 12:00am on 25-May-2019
path: /Woodworking | permalink | edit (requires password)

Comments:
0 comments, click here to add the first



Crib for Granddaughter

Furnished content.
(from Lumberjocks.com)


Crib for GranddaughterI made this crib for my first grandchild. My daughter chose spindles instead of slats…ouch 52 turned spindles! I'll admit I was pretty “grumpy” about all the lathe work, but softened up about it once I saw pictures of my granddaughter in the crib. A Oneway center steady helped reduce vibrations on these long, thin spindles. Most of the turning was done with a roughing gouge and then smoothed up with a Veritas sanding block. I've got no pride in method and this seemed incredibly effective for me…The frame is cherry and the spindles are hard maple. The crib meets current federal standards and I added a third level that is 6” deeper than required (for potential future escape artists!) Adding 6” to the spindles made the turning more difficult, but it's nice to have a deeper option.The end assemblies have tenons at the top and bottom to better align the sides as the knockdown fasteners are tightened. The knockdown fasteners screw into threaded inserts. This is so much better than the old adjustable crib sides that are now banned. This design doesn't rack at all. I'm very pleased with the stability of the crib.Franklin liquid hide glue made for a drama-free glue-up of all the spindles to the frame. The slow set time gives plenty of time for assembly. The glue has an expiration date, but it's worth trying for complex assemblies.I used one coat of Tried and True varnish for the finish. This is supposedly a very safe finish, but I hate working with it and that's why I stopped at one coat. In hindsight, I should have used wipe on poly. It turned out though…a labor of love!



Read more here

posted at: 12:00am on 25-May-2019
path: /Woodworking | permalink | edit (requires password)

Comments:
0 comments, click here to add the first



May 2019
Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
     
 


Promoted by Feed Shark





RSS (site)  RSS (path)

ATOM (site)  ATOM (path)

Categories
 - blog home

 - Announcements  (0)
 - Annoyances  (0)
 - For_Sale  (0)
 - Home_and_Garden  (0)
 - Humor  (0)
 - Industry_News  (1341)
 - Massachusetts_USA  (0)
     - Swansea  (0)
 - Notices  (0)
 - Observations  (0)
 - Oddities  (0)
 - Reading  (0)
     - Books  (0)
     - Ebooks  (0)
     - Magazines  (0)
     - Online_Articles  (0)
 - Reviews  (0)
 - Rhode_Island_USA  (0)
     - Providence  (0)
 - Shop  (0)
 - Shop_Improvements  (2)
 - Woodworking  (3272)
     - Projects  (1)
     - Resources  (3)
     - Techniques  (179)
     - Tips  (0)
     - Videos  (7)


Archives
 -2019  December  (44)
 -2019  November  (89)
 -2019  October  (89)
 -2019  September  (90)
 -2019  August  (92)
 -2019  July  (94)
 -2019  June  (89)
 -2019  May  (97)
 -2019  April  (89)
 -2019  March  (100)
 -2019  February  (93)
 -2019  January  (88)
 -2018  December  (28)


My Sites

 - Millennium3Publishing.com

 - SponsorWorks.net

 - ListBug.com

 - TextEx.net

 - FindAdsHere.com

 - VisitLater.com