The Woodshop Shed

adventures in woodworking and home maintenance, from my shop in an oversized backyard shed

March 2019
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Infill Low Angle Mini Block Plane

Furnished content.
(from Lumberjocks.com)


Infill Low Angle Mini Block PlaneI wanted to jump right in with my new milling machine so I thought a small infill would be perfect! I underestimated the labor involved by 2 miles, even using the mill I cut it close and hand filed the dovetails to fit.
It's 99% built from scratch – the screw came from the hardware store (common 1/4-20 in case it ever need replaced). Everything else was machined in my home shop, even the blade. The intended use is to clean up joinery, especially dovetails and easing /chamfering edges.The sole is mild steel, sides and clamp are brass and the blade is 5160 steel. The bed angle is an ultra low 10 degrees and I put a 30 degree bevel on the blade honed to 800 grit. There's room for improvement but it tested nicely for me!
The wood is figured /tiger maple and in the right light you'll see ribbons across it.
The whole thing is coated in Renaissance wax. My pictures on the black granite background are from right after applying the wax- mistake! It looks much better in Joe's (Pointer) pics so I used a couple of his here.Here are some pics of the process.
Cutting tails first
Setting up the vise to cut pins
ready for assembly
Getting there!
I didn't take pics from this point to the finish, it was all blur! The blade was cut from a piece of 1/8” 5160 knife steel, I put a 30 degree bevel on it with the mill then hand honed the flats and bevel on my granite surface plate. It was hardened using a torch til non-magnetic, quenched in peanut oil and tempered in the shop toaster oven.The clamping block was machined from a slice of 1-1/2” square brass bar I had on hand and the pivot pin is 3/8” stainless bar.Overall the sole is about 3×1-1/2” and I hope it is a great user for years to come for Joe!
Thanks to Kenny & Dave K for pointers along the way!!



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2019 surprise swap

Furnished content.
(from Lumberjocks.com)


2019 surprise swapThis was my entry sent to recipient LJ Earls. The all walnut segmented lidded vase with finial is from piece of walnut found in an old barn in Big Springs, Ky. This was my first try at loose rings cut into the finial. The all wooden knife ( not good for anything but to talk about) with the end of a 45 caliber shell casing for an emblem is redheart w/all the light colored wood being hard maple. Have made appx. 252 bowls and vases and about 1080 wooden knives since my retirement.



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STL185: Reading Bob Van Dyke's Mind

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Bob, Mike, and Ben discuss tear-out prone woods, milling long vs. short pieces, jointer blade height, and Mike and Ben prove that they know Bob a bit too well

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Daylight Savings Time

Furnished content.
(from Lumberjocks.com)


Daylight Savings TimeFor the Spring Surprise Swap I decided I wanted to make a clock that looked something like this for my swap recipient – TomGrin:After a lot of tinkering around I settled on a 1” A&C style mortise and tenon frame that was 18”x6”x9” to hold the clock cube. The side panels are QSWO with cutouts to provide some negative space contrast.Since I like to make inlaid panels, I made the clock face from maple, oak, chestnut, katalox, walnut, and black palm. I also made a spare:The clock opening was made using a circle jig and routering a hole in the walnut front, then making a oak inset ring. The glass (poly carbonate) is held in place with an oak spacer that has a slightly smaller round opening cut into it for the hour and minute hands.A hole in the bottom of the cube allows the pendulum to freely swing between the supports. There are 2 pins that hold the cube in place on the supports. Access to the AA battery and the interior of the cube is from the back by removing a sliding panel through the bottom of the cube.The pendulum is made from a straight piece of oak glued to a piece that had a circle cut out of it and then the top of the arch was rounded out. The bob is another piece of walnut that is held in place on the back side of the pendulum.I wasn't sure how well things would turn out so I made 3 clocks. Tom received the oak and walnut version. The cherry and walnut version went to Brandon as a side swap. The last version (cherry/walnut, hybrid A&C with squared plugs and tapered legs) is sitting on the hutch next to the lidded vase that I received from PoosPleasures.All of the clocks have quartz pendulum movements from Schlabaugh and Sons. They were finished with Arm-R-Seal and a final coat of poly, lightly sanded to 2000 grit and buffed with Behlen's deluxing compound.A couple folks asked if I could put a blog together with more build details. I will work on one this weekend.



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