The Woodshop Shed

adventures in woodworking and home maintenance, from my shop in an oversized backyard shed

January 2023
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More patching of workbenches

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(from WoodNet.net)


A month or so back I mentioned and showed a picture of a bench patch for one of the KCWG surfaces. Some people were a bit offended in my choice of patch shape, but the reason for the patch was an "oh s***t" moment with a router for a new woodworker. So seemed appropriate.

Well this time, while the damage was still done with a router, it wasn't a deep plunge. Instead it was a lack of attention paid to a still spinning bit on a palm router. End result was a bit of modern art gouged into an area 3" x 5". Since (another new woodworker) was lacking attention span their patch is a squirrel. Didn't have any maple at hand so made the body from oak (acorns!) and the beady little eye from walnut (walnuts!).


.jpg  squirrel.jpg (Size: 94.96 KB / Downloads: 139)

Again this is done by going toThe Noun Projectwebsite and finding the appropriate artwork in SVG (I have a pro-account so I get automatic full use of files). A little modification and then off to the Shaper Origin. About 30 minutes later the patch is glued in and waiting for trimming flush.

Yes, there is another squiggle off to the side but I didn't want to make the squirrel 8" wide. And I punted on grain direction for the same reason. Used his tummy to cover the damaged area.

Also fixed few other less exciting mistakes. Deepest was from a Festool Domino when (again a new user) didn't check settings and plunged about 1/4" into the edge of a bench.

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posted at: 12:31pm on 31-Jan-2023
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Where are tall columns made?

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(from WoodNet.net)


We visited a church where the sanctuary hastwelve fluted columns. Maybe 30 inches diameter. Probably called neoclassical. They are about 30 feet tall. Whether tapered or not, I couldn't tell. I assume made ofwood, but didn't go knock on one. The church is only 20 years old, so these would have been made about that time. What kind of shop does it take to make these huge, beautiful columns?
Peter

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posted at: 12:31pm on 31-Jan-2023
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Simple drawer box help needed

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(from WoodNet.net)


Hi,
I tried to have reasonably simple drawer box made out of 1/2 ply, banded top edges, measured everything down to 1/16 inch, used Yonico Router Bits Drawer Front Joint Reversible 1/2-Inch Shank to route joints. Dry assembled it - perfect!
Once I have put yellow glue into routed joint grooves and tried to actually do final assembly - this is when the disaster struck. It turns out the glue is sticking much faster than it is setting or drying. Very difficult to have all the sides aligned correctly at once. By alignment I mean when the edges of two adjacent boards are at the same height and the joint looks seemless from the top.

You can't slide the board aginst another since glue just sticks. Ended up with about 1/32 inch misaligned sides, couldn't do anything about it until glue actually set in 10-15 minutes and nothing was possible to do at all. So the box came out less than perfect.
What is anybody doing to have the sides perfectly aligned at the very moment you join the sides? Simple corner clamps do not really help - the sides fall out of alignment almost immediately. This applies to rabbet joint or similar.

The only other way of doing box is likely dovetails, but this sounds like a lot more work and in general an overkill for simple drawers. Or maybe that is actually better, easier? If so, I am ready to try that, but I need to know if this is really the only option left. I am OK to spend time experimenting with routing, this part I can handle. It is glue that sets me up.

Thanks,

Niko

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posted at: 12:31pm on 31-Jan-2023
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Can green mold ruin the wood?

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(from WoodNet.net)


I noticed today that on the osage wood planks that I had cut this autumn some green mold appeared. Between the bark and the sapwood. I noticed this earlier on the firewood too, but it was not extensive, however now on the firewood it is proliferating seriously. In spite of that both stock is under roof safe from water, especially the planks.

Do I need to worry, or it will go away when the warmer weather comes? Now it is winter here where I live, we had record breaking amount of rain in the past 2 weeks.

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[Image: IMG-20230127-134440.jpg]
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[Image: IMG-20230127-134452.jpg]
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posted at: 12:00am on 28-Jan-2023
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Online Woodworking Calculator

(Feet, Inches, fraction calculator)

Feet Inches /
Add/Subtract
Enter a measurement in feet, inches, fraction
Click + or -
Enter another measurement in feet, inches, fraction
Click =

Multiply/Divide
Enter a measurement in feet, inches, fraction
Click X or /
Enter a number in the X / Box
Click =


posted at: 3:38pm on 27-Jan-2023
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Unexpected Out of the Box Chair Restoration - Part 6

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(from Popularwoodworking.com)


As you recall, a few months ago, I wrote about a beautiful chair made of solid mahogany that we bought and found out that it was sadly damaged during shipping. The vendor sent us a replacement, but I decided to …Source

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posted at: 12:00am on 27-Jan-2023
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Contoured Sanding Block

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(from Popularwoodworking.com)


To sand a lot of molding, glue 80-grit sandpaper to several inches of the molding. Rub a block of Styrofoam on the sandpaper until the block conforms to the molding's contour. Glue sandpaper to the block, then sand the molding.…Source

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posted at: 12:00am on 26-Jan-2023
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Leaning Shelves

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(from Popularwoodworking.com)


We improve a contemporary design to make it sturdier, a bit curvier and easier to build. Editor's note: This article originally appeared in the August 2005 issue of Popular Woodworking Magazine. It was about 1 a.m., and I was …Source

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posted at: 12:00am on 26-Jan-2023
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What Kind of Glue to Use

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(from WoodNet.net)


A carpenter brought me an unfinished project asking for help. He has made a 5-foot wide arch of 3/4 white oak to fit in a church doorway. He made the arch out of nine segments 4 inches wide and 12 inches long. The butt joints have biscuit joinery. He glued the segments together with yellow glue. Clamps are of no use on an arch, so he pressed the segments together as best he could. When the glue was dry, each of the joints had a small gap he filled with wood putty. It looks awful on what should be a quality job, so he asked me for help.


By using a heat lamp, all the joints have been pulled apart and the biscuits removed. The butt joints do fit nicely, so using biscuits again, the arch is ready to be re-glued.

Here is my question: the endgrain on each piece looks shiny, becausethey soaked up the first glue. What kind of glue will be best to use now. Also, I will pull the joints tightly together using pocket hole screws on the back. Thanks in advance. Peter

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posted at: 12:02am on 25-Jan-2023
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Making Your Own Plywood

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(from WoodNet.net)


There is a piece of heavy-duty window screen on the bottom and top of the glue up to allow the vacuum to find every nock and cranny. With yellow glues I leave it in the vacuum bag for a couple of hours. It doesn't really dry in the bag but the water in the glue migrates into the wood so it sets up. When I take it out of the bag I put the glue-up on a flat surface, cover it with a piece of plywood and put some weight on top so it will cure flat. I leave it like that overnight and then let it cure for at least another day before drum sanding it to final thickness.

The glue-up I showed has cherry on the outside and center ply, with ash in the cross layers. I wouldn't want to try this for anything much larger than 2 x 5 ft, since my drum sander is 24" wide and 5' is about the limit of my vacuum bag, but if you have larger equipment and some help it certainly would be possible with a slower setting glue.

John

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posted at: 12:02am on 25-Jan-2023
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Fighting Evil Alien Technology

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(from Popularwoodworking.com)


Beating it requires knowing the right way to nail a board. When I was about 8 years old, I decided that I needed to construct a sturdy fort to protect myself from the army of aliens (who cleverly had …Source

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posted at: 12:02am on 25-Jan-2023
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Common Woodworking Mistakes

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(from Popularwoodworking.com)


There are many things we do wrong but we don't know they're wrong. In woodworking there are two kinds of mistakes: There's the garden-variety gaffe where we simply cut a board too short or botch a dimension, and the …Source

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posted at: 12:00am on 24-Jan-2023
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Extending Glue Working Time

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(from WoodNet.net)


In case you didn't know, from thislink.

Slow-Setting Glue
Yellow woodworkers glue is terrific stuff. But it's not always the best choice in every gluing situation. Sometimes you need more time to apply glue and assemble all the parts than the few minutes yellow glue gives you.

There are a several things you can do in this kind of situation. Whenever we have problems getting a complicated glue job together quickly, we sometimes switch from yellow woodworkers glue (like Titebond or Elmer's Carpenters' glue) to a white all-purpose glue (such as Elmer's Glue-All).

Another option is to use a hide glue or a powdered plastic (urea-formaldehyde) resin glue. Both of these glues set up slower than yellow glue and are just as strong. (You can find them at most hardware stores and in many woodworking mail order catalogs.)

Garrett Wadehttp://www.garrettwade.comsells a "Slo-Set" glue in their catalog that gives you more working time (20-30 minutes), but still achieves 75% of its strength after clamping for 30 minutes.

The last option is one of the easiest. You can thin Titebond yellow glue with about 5% water (one part water to twenty parts glue). One of the researchers at Franklin Industries (manufacturer of Titebond) told us that this will slow the set time about 50%. And he said that it won't have any significant effect on the strength of the glue joint as long as you don't mix in more than 5% water.

To test this, we glued up three sets of boards. The first set didn't have any water mixed in with the glue. The second set had 5% water, and the third set had 10% water. We didn't stick the boards together right away, but let them sit open.

As expected, the first boards got tacky within minutes. The second set took longer. And the glue on the third set of boards was too thin and runny.

After the glue joints were put together and dry, we broke the joints apart. The 10% boards broke apart at the glue line -- not a good sign. But the other two sets pulled splinters from both sides of the glue line. That's the sign of a good glue joint -- one where the glue is stronger than the surrounding wood fibers.

Go toTip #62


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posted at: 12:00am on 23-Jan-2023
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What Tool Is This?

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(from WoodNet.net)


Saw this hanging on the wall at a Cracker Barrel restaurant. Can't figure this one out. Any ideas?

.jpg  Unknown_Tool_Small.jpg (Size: 576.13 KB / Downloads: 86)

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posted at: 12:00am on 23-Jan-2023
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CNC engraving in Maple

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(from WoodNet.net)


Hi,

I'm asking for a friend who is having a shadowbox made, and he wants to do it in maple, if it engraves well.

What says the WoodNet braintrust?

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posted at: 12:00am on 21-Jan-2023
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Brush Care 101

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(from Popularwoodworking.com)


How to choose, condition, and clean a finishing brush. It's really tempting to buy an inexpensive brush for finishing. Say you spend $4 on a standard paint brush and throw it away rather than taking the time to clean it. …Source

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posted at: 12:00am on 21-Jan-2023
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ShopNotes Podcast Episode 143

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(from Popularwoodworking.com)


Phil, Logan, and John are back on the ShopNotes Podcast talking about “What Grinds Your Chisels” and other updates on the latest issue of PopWood Magazine and so much more! Find all of the ShopNotes podcast episodes here. …Source

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posted at: 12:00am on 21-Jan-2023
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Unsupported span for 6/4 countertop

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(from WoodNet.net)


I'm working on my bar build right now. The opening in the middle there is exactly 48", and will house the kegerator and the beverage cooler. The countertops are 6/4 sapele, so they are both rigid and heavy.

How necessary is it to support thespan? I plan to use at least a2x2 clear (radiata pine from Home Depot) screwed to the studs along the back. I feel like this should be sufficient, since if it wanted to sag it would be somewhat difficult if it were only unsupported in the front. It would be possible to do some sort of metal support between the appliances (they're both 23.5" wide) for additional support, but I don't know if that really buys me anything. It would also only support about 6" from the back wall, and I'm not sure how much that buys on a 25" deep countertop.

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posted at: 12:00am on 20-Jan-2023
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Outdoor Furniture

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(from WoodNet.net)


I am reupholstering exterior furniture. Under the existing fabric is plywood. Because of the age and delamination I cannot tell what plywood was previously used. Any suggestions as to what type of plywood I should get?

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posted at: 12:00am on 20-Jan-2023
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Massive Quartersawn white oak

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(from WoodNet.net)


I am working on a huge houseremodel
There is a thread down in off topic
Working on the stairs and started looking through my wood stash for suitable material

Check out the size of this stuff
This wood will be used for stair treads
QSWO 12' long, 8/4 by 12-14 wide


.jpeg  023E1315-E574-42EE-A6B9-270373CA6B39.jpeg (Size: 125.3 KB / Downloads: 263)
.jpeg  0D1223B0-16DA-411A-8BED-B0F011B180AA.jpeg (Size: 83.96 KB / Downloads: 263)

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posted at: 12:00am on 20-Jan-2023
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Router Sitter

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(from Popularwoodworking.com)


I don't like to lay my router on its side with the bit exposed, so I built a stand for it. It's just a 3/4″ x 8″ x 8″ board with a 2″ dia. hole in the center. The board …Source

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posted at: 12:00am on 20-Jan-2023
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One Stick, All the Info

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(from Popularwoodworking.com)


Measured drawings for some, story sticks for me (and others). I once had a job making a couple of wainscot chairs and chests for the National Park Service. After barely surviving the paperwork it took to get the job in …Source

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posted at: 12:00am on 20-Jan-2023
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Table Saw Infeed Table

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(from Popularwoodworking.com)


The limited crosscut capacity of my cabinet saw made it a challenge to cut wider boards, so I designed an infeed table that hangs on a wall when not in use and quickly and securely attaches to the front …Source

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posted at: 12:00am on 19-Jan-2023
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The Amazing Table Saw Bowl

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(from Popularwoodworking.com)


It's just like sawing a cove molding, but now the wood is round. You're kidding me! That's everybody's first reaction when I tell them that I've figured out a way to make a bowl on the table saw. Then they …Source

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posted at: 12:00am on 19-Jan-2023
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Shop Lights

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(from WoodNet.net)


seems like a good deal on some LED...
At Wally World

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posted at: 12:01am on 18-Jan-2023
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Atoma Diamond Stones Price Reduction

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(from Popularwoodworking.com)


Diamond stones are the bedrock of my sharpening routine. I use them as my main abrader throughout my sharpening/honing sessions because they preserve their flatness and keep their hard particles sharp longer than other media. But even diamond stones get …Source

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posted at: 12:01am on 18-Jan-2023
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ShopNotes Podcast Episode 142

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(from Popularwoodworking.com)


This week on the ShopNotes Podcast, Phil, Logan, and John are reading some listener comments from last weeks episode, talking shop injuries, and updating you on the latest goings on in the woodworking world. This episode's FREE plan is a …Source

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posted at: 12:00am on 17-Jan-2023
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Wall mount dust collection

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(from WoodNet.net)


Hi
Looking into a wall mounted dust collection, 120 volt for now, 240 maybe later.

Small shop, one tool at a time.

Oneida, Rockler, Grizzly, ?

Thoughts?

Thanks
Mark

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posted at: 12:00am on 17-Jan-2023
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Anyone bought from Irion recently?

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Their website looks like they have been fully assimilated by the whole river table/slab craze. I just want some plain 8/4 maple.

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posted at: 12:00am on 17-Jan-2023
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Sizing a work bench

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(from WoodNet.net)


Handplanesandmore made an interesting observation about a new Yankee post on this forum. He said that Norm made it a point to point out that the bench height was more or less the same as the table saw's height so that it could be used as an infeed support for an 8 foot sheet of plywood.

Having built 4 different benches here is what I found out. The first one was to low and gave me a mediate back ack. The second one overcompensated on the height and wasn't wide enough for how I wanted to usethe bench. The third one the height was better and all around its options were better but I wanted more storage because I like to be able to work
on all four sides.

First of all I think that a bench should be sized to fit the area allowed for it. I have a large area so I thought why not a bench big enough that I could put the top in my truckand still close the tail gate. My truck has a 8 foot box so why not build a bench 8 feet long. More on this a little latter because I didn't quite think it through. Building the frame work let me actually visualize the work area.

So I framed up a rough bench the length I though would work. width was a moot point at this time


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And then I started looking for the prefect height. First using a hand plane. I started where I thought a great height would be and then tried it out and lowered it a little and then a little more. And then finally I got the height of where my body really liked working at. first using a plane and then a saw.


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I like shoulder vises so here is my developing of shoulder vise dimensions


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The height that my body liked was 34 inches. Actually I could have went just a little lower.
I like to stand on a rubber mat for my feet and it is about 3/8ths of an inch thick. I knew it could be a little lower and the rubber mate lowered the top by raisig me. I settled on 34 inches.

After my bench was finished I happened to come accosted a You Tube video by Jim Tolpin. It is well worth watching. He said that the bench should be in proportion to your body and 4 spread hands high. and his went to the top of the wood he was planning. My hand spread is 8 1/2 inches and 4spreadhands are are34 inches So my bench is about 3/8ths of an inch lower than 34 inches because of the rubber mat. Or 3/8th inch higher than the top of the 3/4 thick wood he is planning.

Some interesting facts from what I read is that Frank Klausz and I are about the same height, And according to the work bench book by Scott Landis's book Franks bench is 33 inches neigh. So with the mat I am about 5/8ths higher than Frank's

So after all the trial and air I went through to get it right, .Jim Tolpin got it right with body proportions for my body. And after I wrote all of this I checked and the table saw height of my Saw Stop table saw is 34 inched neigh.

Also the Uni saw's is 34 inched neigh so Norm got it right for me anyway. And Handplanesandmore made an observation and called attention to it which caused me to write.

If you are planning on building a bench I hope this helps.

Tom

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posted at: 12:00am on 16-Jan-2023
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veneering with contact cement, requires paper backed or no?

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So I need to veneer a long plywood panel (~80") with the 1/16" white oak veneer I have, but it's too big for my vacuum bag.

Can I use contact cement on a non-paper backed, 1/16" white oak veneer? I've used contact cement for veneering before, but only with paper backed.

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posted at: 12:00am on 16-Jan-2023
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Ax Handle Question

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(from WoodNet.net)


One of my good friends likes making ax handles, especially for splitting mauls. He and I both usually use oak, hickory, or locust to make them. He recently ran across a good collection of mulberry and wondered if it would work to make a few handles with it instead.

My reply was that mulberry will not have the density or strength of the other three but I do know that it has good rot resistance, similar to locust. I decide to pose the question here in case you have an opinion or may have tried this already. I believe it's worth a discussion. What says the Forum?
Rolleyes

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posted at: 12:00am on 14-Jan-2023
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Dark Sky >>> Apple Weather

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We liked Dark Sky and its format, Apple Weather not so much.

So. we switched to The Weather Channel.

Dunno why Apple didn't leave well enough alone.

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posted at: 12:00am on 14-Jan-2023
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Binding Clamps

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(from Popularwoodworking.com)


Make your own light-duty one-handed workholding wonders. Like most workshops, mine is well-populated with spring clamps, the ubiquitous tool for applying localized pressure with one hand while holding the workpiece (or workpieces) with the other. But one of the …Source

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posted at: 12:00am on 14-Jan-2023
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New Yankee Workshop tour by Russell Morash

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A quick tour fromthe actualowner himself. We hardly ever see Russ Morash, well here he is:

https://youtu.be/KkNhWgoTtd8

The NYW - more than any other show - has inspired me to take up the hobby of woodworking and build the woodshop that I enjoy so much today.

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posted at: 12:00am on 14-Jan-2023
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Roast Your Own

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(from Popularwoodworking.com)


Cooking wood in your kitchen can produce results that rival specialty kilns. Luthiers have long used roasted or tempered wood in stringed instruments because the roasting process pre-stresses the wood and caramelizes the sugars, sealing the pores and rendering …Source

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posted at: 12:00am on 13-Jan-2023
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17th-century 'Desk Box'

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Simple joinery will keep this piece together for centuries. Books, papers, lamps, candlesticks, spoons, Legos, clothing, electronics and more all end up on top of any flat surfaces in our house. As a joiner, I have made lots of …Source

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posted at: 12:00am on 12-Jan-2023
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What happened to Lumberjocks?

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I've been away a while... it looks like an entirely different site now. (not sure I like it)

Did someone step in and buy it? What happened to Martin?

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posted at: 12:00am on 11-Jan-2023
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Drilling a Long (12") Hole - Update

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I am upgrading our main bdrm closet system (new cabinets, shelving, etc.) and planning to add several miniature puck (accent) lights on the bottom (front) side of some of the shelves. In my OP I was asking how to/best way to drill a straight hole to run lo voltage wire from the back of the shelf (about 12) and hit the puck light location (see attached link for the OP).

https://forums.woodnet.net/showthread.php?tid=7371580

Had some great responses/ideas - but after some thought I came up with what I think is simpler (and more reliable) way to route the wires to the puck lights.


I am using furniture grade ply for the shelves and edge banding the front edges using a matching edge banding router bit set (Whiteside 3400). This results in a convex V cut on the front edge of the plywood self and a corresponding concave V' on the edging material (Mahogany in my case). I realized by lopping off the end of the concave V I could create a channel in which to run wires. Then a short hole from the front of the shelf to the puck. I can run the wire(s) out the sides and up to the top where I am mounting the lo voltage 12Vdc driver.


.jpg  Screenshot 2023-01-10 174012.jpg (Size: 45.83 KB / Downloads: 23)

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Wiping Varnish - What is it?

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(from Popularwoodworking.com)


Wiping varnish is simply any brand of oil-based alkyd (regular) varnish or oil-based polyurethane varnish in any sheen (gloss or satin) thinned about half with mineral spirits (paint thinner). Rules for Application Wipe or brush on the wood and…Source

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Homemade Bench Grips

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(from Popularwoodworking.com)


Bench grips are handy for holding parts above the bench for routing, sanding or finishing. To make them, just cut some wood and rubber shelf liner into 2″ to 3″ squares. Glue the shelf liner onto both sides of each …Source

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posted at: 12:00am on 11-Jan-2023
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Squirrel Surprise

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(from Popularwoodworking.com)


A project with a bite.By Brendan Isaac JonesPage: 64From the February 2011 issue #188Buy this issue nowHow do three carpenters feed an abandoned baby squirrel? Glass dropper in hand, huddled around a kitchen table in the historic district of downtown Alexandria, Va., we discovered the answer: with great difficulty.The day previous, atop scaffolding in the driving rain, Jay pried off a return from the termite-damaged cornice of a house on Prince Street. We heard the sound of scampering, and a rust-red squirrel exploded out from the darkness of rotted wood. It balanced briefly on Jay's arm, seemed to consider the weather, then trotted down the side of the building. So it goes when you're replacing the entire cornice on a 19th-century townhouse. Back to work.The following day, as we replaced termite-ridden framing, a splinter of wood fell on the yellow grating of the scaffold. Just before we swept it onto the waiting canvas 40' below, the splinter moved, and revealed a dun-colored belly, tiny whiskers and two slits where eyes should be. It looked, with its little arms, like a ginger root. We picked him up, and decided we had in our hands a baby squirrel. Naturally, we named him Cornice.Article: Read "Almost a Plane Wreck."Articles: Read our many free articles about hand tool use.Source

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posted at: 12:00am on 10-Jan-2023
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ShopNotes Podcast Episode 141

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(from Popularwoodworking.com)


Just the good ol' boys, Phil, Logan, and John are making their way the only way they know how by kicking off the first podcast of the year by discussing the tool buying process and so much more. Free Stacking …Source

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posted at: 12:00am on 10-Jan-2023
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embedding nuts in a work bench

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(from WoodNet.net)


I just sold a work bench in the S@S section of this forum. And I got a questionfrom a person who has purchased some Moxon hardware from me. the question is how do I embed the nuts.

I have been building for 50 years now and I am out of room to build anything more for the house including the kitchen cabinets. The bench is the4th work bench I have sold. I still have one for myselfAnd I like building work benches. I plan on building and selling more.

First of all I prefer a bench with a shoulder vise, a tail vise and square dog holes. Round dog holes are much easier to put in, But if one purchasesround dogs they are much harder to move up and down and to me a real pain in the behind. If you disagree with me andprefer a different type of top, or vise, or like round dogs, please feel free to do so by writing about it in your own post. This post is about building a moxon vise into the work bench, not adding one after the fact.

I do like a shoulder vise and the vise screwon my present bench I shortened the shoulder vise screw I purchased from Lee Valley by 2 inches. I like to get up close and personal when cutting dovetails. I at my age I find I have to lean over to far when using the shoulder vise.

Here is a picture of my first moxon vise.


.jpg  DSC03553.JPG (Size: 161.26 KB / Downloads: 60)

The things I like about it is I can screw the studs in far enough that only a small length of thread sticks out, ON the other hand it is to big and bulky I have to get clamps out and storing takes up a lot of room

I can drill a hole the size of the flats on the nutsand chisel out the rest so I can insert the nut. I dowel the board onto the rest of the top and the board that goes on after to my holes will line up. I drill a hole the rest of the way into the bench so I can thread to screw in as far as I want. The length of the tread sticking out should be adjustable, The first picture is from a different bench


.jpg  DSC03547.JPG (Size: 162.01 KB / Downloads: 59)


.jpg  DSC03548.JPG (Size: 161.49 KB / Downloads: 59)

I use 3nuts One in the middle so it becomes a vise for a vise up to 12 inches wide. The key comes out and moved over to the position for a 24 inch wide vise. That way the chop needs only to be 1 inch thick and not thicker. The bench backs up the back jaw and it only needs to be 1 inch also.

The next ting it to find the rightheight for sawing. I like my elbowto be at 90 degrees. The keys peel the board being cut in the correct orientation for cutting. I like standing when cutting. If you like setting then find the height when setting. The floor may not be level so the bench top may not be level but the top ofthe rear jaw was planed lever before the keys were cut.


.jpg  DSC03240.JPG (Size: 162.29 KB / Downloads: 58)

And a finished vise.


.jpg  DSC03270.JPG (Size: 161.95 KB / Downloads: 56)


.jpg  DSC03271.JPG (Size: 159.81 KB / Downloads: 56)


.jpg  DSC03273.JPG (Size: 161.94 KB / Downloads: 56)

And one last thing to plan for, hold fasts.


.jpg  DSC03268.JPG (Size: 162.23 KB / Downloads: 55)

I hope I have answered the personsquestion. If not let me know

Tom

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posted at: 12:00am on 09-Jan-2023
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Plywood Gripe

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(from WoodNet.net)


I'm trying to get back into woodworking after 4 or 5 years off. I need some plywood to build some shop cabinets. My options are sanded ply from Home Depot for $50 a sheet - but of course it's warped. Or cabinet grade from a lumber yard for $130 a sheet. I guess I just need to bite the bullet.

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posted at: 12:00am on 09-Jan-2023
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Applied drawer bead

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(from WoodNet.net)


Hi,

I have a few vintage pieces with serpentine drawers and applied beads. I assume there are dadoes for these because I stripped the paint on these and none came off. Must be some specialized equipment to make the dado.

I'm planning on duplicating a stain grade cabinet I saw that has a rectangular bead, the bead looks to be about 1/4" wide so easier (second picture). The drawer is bow front. Would this be done with a router + edge guide? Since so much work would go into the drawer front before routingI'm guessing some dedicated jig might be a better choice thenan edge guide. Is an upcut spiral bit the best choice to reduce tearout? Might not do this at all depending on how difficult and how it looks without.

Edit - actually I looked at another similar cabinet from that site and I can see some of those applied pieces are missing and there is a shadow where they used to be so the ones shown in the second picture are likely just glued/pinned.

.jpg  DSC_0233_00001.jpg (Size: 99.51 KB / Downloads: 57)

.jpg  Detail.JPG (Size: 16.04 KB / Downloads: 56)

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posted at: 12:00am on 09-Jan-2023
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Woodworking in America: Amanda N. Ewing

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(from Popularwoodworking.com)


We're interviewing makers from across the country. Today we're featuring Amanda Ewing, a luthier from Tennessee. I was chosen by my path not so long ago. Thanks to all of the twists, turns, and detours along the way, lutherie is …Source

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posted at: 12:00am on 07-Jan-2023
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How can this be a shop tip?

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(from WoodNet.net)


My buddy was furious to see his Wood in his mail box. One guy said he bought a handscrew kit, followed the instructions and made his own handscrew out of wood. And Wood published it as a tip!!!!!!!

Simon

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posted at: 12:00am on 07-Jan-2023
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Back in the Saddle

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(from WoodNet.net)


Haven't cut a dovetail in about 8 years, completed a drawer for a build in for practice before I start my next furniture project. I'm pleased with these:

.jpg  dovetail4.jpg (Size: 573.65 KB / Downloads: 139)

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posted at: 12:00am on 07-Jan-2023
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Clayton Boyer's Deco Clock

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(from WoodNet.net)


Since I bought the CNC I've gotten interested in wood gear clocks. They are pretty poor timekeepers but fascinating mechanisms. When I get enough skill I plan to develop some original designs, but for now I'm building ones others have designed to learn the key concepts, especially as regards tolerances. You may remember a wall clock I built a couple of months ago. That clock has so many problems that about the most I learned was to never use any of their construction methods or design tolerances. After that experience I decided to buy Clayton Boyer's book on clock design. He has been building clocks for decades, so I figured he knows what he's doing. The bookis well written and covers most details required to build wood gear clocks. From there I decided to buy the plans for one of his clocks to see how his theories and methodslook in aclock of his design. Again, very well written instructions and detailed plans, both for folks who want to saw out the parts by hand from his full-scale drawingsand those of us using the dxf files witha CNC.

I chose to build the Deco desk clock because it's a desk clock and I liked how it looks. I don't have all that many walls to hang clocks, so a desk clock made sense whether I keep it or gift it to someone. A picture of the Deco clock on Boyer's website looks like this:

[Image: AL9nZEWKQ5zfVCob3dXZB60UsswmlTmiZa33UjlD...authuser=1]

This clock has a lot of details in how it's constructed that aren't readily visible once it's together. It's designed so that once the hands are set they will remain synchronized if you manually adjust one or the other. The wind mechanism for the torsion spring is very detailed in how the ratchet mechanism functions, which allows it to be rewound from the front. Anyway, lots of stuff going on behind the scenes that takes quite a bit of time to understand and then construct, even after the parts are cut out on the CNC.

I made my version from ash and cherry plywood that I made by slicing veneer and laying them up in my vacuum bag. You could use high quality commercialplywood but the species options are probably limited in the thicknesses needed, mostly 1/8",1/4", and 3/8". It looks like this:

[Image: AL9nZEUHQKxjUxRCPOOOYjMRenJZcVeUcgeRWcLQ...authuser=1]

[Image: AL9nZEUgTP4x3JKEyj9IqYgYZWVY48A3OL-iL7eA...authuser=1]

[Image: AL9nZEUObn5nqqTQtSWFH5knBgCy5dAQ1gauv-Og...authuser=1]

Unlike the wall clock, this one worked straight out of the gate, with only a little tuning required. The piece of wood hanging in the middle of the steel shaft escapement/pendulum shaft was added to stop the shaft from jumping in the frame holes, which ended up oversized after I rebored them manually because they were too tight off the CNC. It will be removed after I rework the shaft holes, somehow.

You can see the spring in the last photo. It has quite a lot of force, over 9 in-lb. That may not sound like much but it is when you try to uncoil the spring to install it. The spring is rewound from the front side using the key laying in front of the clock. It will run for 28 hours when fully wound.

I finished the clock frame, pendulum, and basewith Watco Danish Oil but left the gear train unfinished. Quite a project. Here's a link to a short videoof the clock running, in case you're interested.



John

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posted at: 12:00am on 07-Jan-2023
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Mobile, Sturdy Light Stand

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(from Popularwoodworking.com)


Good light is a must in every workshop, but sometimes I need a little extra light in just the right place. To make my light/magnifier more portable, I drilled a hole in a handscrew to fit the light's post. Now …Source

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posted at: 12:00am on 07-Jan-2023
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Pegboard Shelves for Planes

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(from Popularwoodworking.com)


Most of us have used, at some point, a pegboard to organize our tools. In fact, a few years ago, I reclaimed a hanging pegboard toolbox (a colleague of mine discarded it) and have been using it ever since. While …Source

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posted at: 12:00am on 06-Jan-2023
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Router Bit Caddy

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(from Popularwoodworking.com)


Separate, sort, and see your collection With just five different parts to make, this easy-to-build caddy accommodates bits with both 1/2″ and 1/4″ shafts. It can be customized to handle just about any collection. Long bits have plenty of room …Source

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posted at: 12:00am on 05-Jan-2023
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Electric desk workbench?

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(from WoodNet.net)


I have an electric height adjustable desk in my shop office, and have been thinking about repurposing it to use on the shop floor.

It says the dual motors will lift 200lbs, so I was thinking of hanging some storage for festool systainers under it and using it for doing stuff like general assembly of smaller stuff, electronics, soldering etc, where having it higher for standing work would be nice, and lower for seated work.

Has anyone done something like this, and if sowhat would you do differently?

Thanks
Duke

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posted at: 12:00am on 04-Jan-2023
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Old World Map - A learning experience

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(from WoodNet.net)


I bought a file off Etsy to make this old world map on my CNC.

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posted at: 12:00am on 04-Jan-2023
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wood movement question

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(from WoodNet.net)


Friend asked me to build this simple record player stand. Close up pic seems like they just screwed the top on. Does this type of joinery allow for wood movement? If not any tips on how to design for it.

.jpg  record player cropped.jpg (Size: 112.9 KB / Downloads: 2)

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posted at: 12:00am on 04-Jan-2023
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Double-Duty Edge Guide

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(from Popularwoodworking.com)


Instead of measuring for my circular saw's offset each time I need to make a cut, I use a modified edge guide. I screwed two 3/4″ x 3/4″ x 12″ hardwood blocks to the front and back clamp bars of …Source

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posted at: 12:00am on 04-Jan-2023
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I think track saws are magic

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(from WoodNet.net)


I'm in the process of building a basement bar. Like most things, it's overly ambitious. 10'10" of cabinets/appliances against the wall, 72" coming out of the wall, and then 94" coming back (L shaped). All new flooring (I've got builder grade carpet down there), new lighting, new circuits, new plumbing, the works.

The bar top and countertops will be sapele, because I love it and it's what I use 90% of the time. Somebody else walking in here might think it's overused, but it's my house so who cares. Anyway, the longest section of countertop will be 10'10" x 25" out of 6/4 sapele. (Yes, it will be very heavy.) My local supplier (CP Johnson, who I recommend highly every chance I get) carries a great stock of sapele, so I was able to get a few wide 6/4 boards that were 12' long. It's nearly impossible to joint boards anywhere near that size, so I thought the best option would be a track saw. I planed them first, which was a challenge in and of itself since I don't have that much room in my shop and planing 9" x 12' boards is a pretty big task. That would give me parallel surfaces to register the track to, thus (ideally) making it easier to get a 90 degree edge.

But I didn't own a track saw. After some research, I went with budget options - a Wen track saw and Powertec track. I have more than a few pieces of both and have been happy despite them essentially being "high-end Harbor Freight" grade. I am not sure that end-to-end assembly of three pieces of track is the ideal use case, but I used two clamps, three sections of track, and that saw to square the edges. The only upgrade I made was a Makita blade.
I have to say I am extremely impressed. I plan to use 10x50 Domino tenons for alignment and strength and clamp as needed, but this was the dry fit I got. That's two clamps, one at zero and one at 12'. The boards are relatively flat, and I have very little vertical misalignment even with two sawhorses and a 12' span. With the tenons I imagine it will be even better. But the mating surfaces are pretty amazing, and I have to imagine everything will disappear with a few more clamps (the widest gap even now is probably 1/64"). I used it to break down all of the plywood I used (prefinished maple, 1/2" and 3/4") and it did an excellent job with that, but I also figured that was the intended use so that wasn't unexpected. But to be able to "joint" boards this size this well is really unusual. I mean, what would a Festool or Makita do if the budget options can do this?

Highly recommend getting one if you don't have one already.

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posted at: 12:00am on 03-Jan-2023
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Universal Planer Sled

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(from Popularwoodworking.com)


Universal Planer Sled Let's face it: running a twisted board through the planer doesn't make it flat. The board will still be twisted when it comes out. The trick is to use a sled that prevents the board from rocking …Source

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posted at: 12:00am on 03-Jan-2023
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