The Woodshop Shed

adventures in woodworking and home maintenance, from my shop in an oversized backyard shed

June 2022
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Natural Edge Three Footed Buggy Bowl

Furnished content.
(from Lumberjocks.com)


This post has two different bowls.#1~ Natural Edge Three Footed Buggy Bowl.This bowl was turned from a piece of birch I found recently.
It was very dry and hard. I could see the beetle tracks before I even started but I wanted to see what I could make with it. I decided before I even started that I would not patch holes with epoxy or crushed stone.As it developed I really liked the character of the piece. I felt that removing part of the mortise I used to turn as three feet would add another great visual element to this bowl.There is no knowing how the bug tracks lay beneath the bark but I really like this little bowl as they were revealed.I sanded it to 400 grit before applying a Maloof style wipe-on finish I've been using lately. That was followed with a couple of coats of Howard's Feed n Wax before buffing it out with a mop head bowl buff. I stayed away from the Beall Polishing process I've been using because of the potential to get lint/fuzzys in all the bug holes.This bowl is 3 at it's highest point and 6 at its widest.This was a test piece for me to decide if I wanted to collect more of the birch. I have a couple of pieces but I did not get a large cache of it.

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posted at: 12:00am on 05-Jun-2022
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Storage Cubbies and Coat Rack for Mud Room

Furnished content.
(from Lumberjocks.com)


Storage Cubbies and Coat Rack for Mud RoomMy wife got tired of storing our outdoor shoes in plastic milk crates and wanted storage cubbies and a new set of coat racks for our mud room.
I designed the cubby units-one large under the coat rack, and one small for the back door area of the mud room entrance.Used 3/4 birch ply from home depot for the carcasses and shelves, and Tamarack (Western Larch) for the shelf edging, cubby tops, and coat rack. The Tamarack is locally sourced in North Idaho and available at the local beam and millwork lumber yard. The shelf and top/bottom edging is 3/8 inch thick, and the tops and coat rack and shelf are 3/4 Tamarack glued up panels.Joinery is biscuits and screws, no glue. I opted to use this joinery for the carcasses as it worked well in previous projects. Joints are strong without glue, and using this method eliminated what would have been a huge “clamp, glue up, and fidget with” process with the number of shelves, top and bottom of the larger unit. I countersunk the screw holes, and used a plug cutter on the drill press to create plugs for the holes out of maple. Once the plugs were glued in, I used my Japanese flush trim saw to cut off the ends and sanded them smooth. The maple matched the birch very closely, and the plugs all but disappeared.All shelves and interior pieces were pre-finished before joinery with Minwax Polycrylic-3 coats brushed on.
The coat rack and shelf unit was joined with biscuits and glue, and the joint strengthened with 2” finish nails driven into the back from the top part of the shelf.The Tamarack will redden and darken over time-much like cherry-and give a nice contrast to the birch.Only change I would make if doing this type of casework again is to spend more $'s on a better quality of cabinet ply. The Home Depot birch ply has a “rice paper thin” veneer, which is easily damaged in milling. I had to glue little chips to fix the dings along edges where they occurred-a pain in the neck!



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posted at: 12:00am on 05-Jun-2022
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Vacuum cart

Furnished content.
(from Lumberjocks.com)


Vacuum cartSubmitted for your delectation is my version of the ubiquitous vacuum cart. Last year on Black Friday I bought a Clear Vue cyclone on sale. Dragging it around the shop with my vacuum for all of 10 minutes was enough to drive me to making the cart. As with most things I design, I built the main concept first, and after a bit of use I engineered out some of the bigger annoyances and added some features I determined were useful. You can see it in the pictures in its 'naked' state when I finished it back in February, and again in its blue livery after it warmed up sufficiently to spray the paint outdoors.A couple features I added after v1.0 are the handle in the front so I can pull the cart if I am in front of it (I got tired of waking around to the back to push it). In order to facilitate the handle I had to stiffen it by tying it to the main vacuum platform with those 45 degree angle pieces, and I added a piece that prevents the hinged portion from lifting up when I pull on the handle. When I need to empty the bucket, I can just slide the piece out and lift up the hinged part. I also added a small aluminum piece onto which I can hook the end of the hose so it's all nice and neat. The hook on the hose was made by bending a piece of solid copper wire around the hose, forming the ends into a J-shape, and soldering the ends together.I suppose some day I will get around to making a shelf and hangers for hoses under the vacuum, but for now it is plenty functional as is, and I will be moving on to other projects.I'm really happy having a cyclone on the vacuum. As many of you that have cyclones can attest to, it really keeps you from having to blow dust out of your vacuum filter every other day. I'm amazed at the fineness of the dust it captures in the bucket.The cart was made from a piece of 1/2 plywood that came as part of a pallet, and some white oak I had lying around. So I have nothing into it cost-wise except the 4 casters and blue paint. The plywood was quite warped, so I had to make a bunch of…scaffolding underneath the main platform to straighten it out. But it all came around to my will in the end.



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posted at: 12:00am on 05-Jun-2022
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