The Woodshop Shed

adventures in woodworking and home maintenance, from my shop in an oversized backyard shed

January 2022
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Fly Fishing Clock Take Three

Furnished content.
(from Lumberjocks.com)


Fly Fishing Clock Take ThreeMy wife is traveling for work, so this weekend I find myself with more time than usual. I received some feedback regarding my previous fly fishing clocks, and I decided to try to incorporate it.I started by making my traditional frame of 6.5” by 9.5”. I had some left over pieces of the ambrosia maple that I'd found at Lowes, so I used those pieces to make the outside frame.I had a fairly good size piece of wild cherry gall among my gall and burl pieces and, after grinding and sanding it, I saw that it would be a good clock face for this particular clock. Following Dick's advice, I tried to keep the frame plain, with only the fish and the fly rod as add-ons. Following fellow LJ Eric's idea, I made my fish from a piece of basswood I'd found at Michael's Craft Store.I will admit it was difficult for me not to add more pieces of burl. I do think the wild cherry gall is handsome enough that it is all that the clock needs. Given the “less busy” style of this clock, I felt that it could handle more elaborate clock hands.I'm pretty pleased with the fish. The fly rod is looking good to me too.



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posted at: 12:00am on 16-Jan-2022
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Bunk Beds from Doug Fir

Furnished content.
(from Lumberjocks.com)


Bunk Beds from Doug FirHey Lumberjocks
Just wanted to post my latest project. Bunkbeds for the grandkids. The twin boys ages 3 1/2 were ready for an upgrade so Mom decided on a simple bunk bed design. Jay Bates had a set of plans which turned out to be great, followed them to the letter. I purchased all the Doug for from a local lumber yard – KD, 1 or better. Yea right. I ran all the lumber through the tablesaw and the planer to square all the stock. I then sanded all the lumber to 150 grit. No need to go further. Following the plan cut list – I completed all the cuts. I drilled the pocket holes on the four uprights.
From there I put together the bed rails and ends as one assembly each. I then preassembled the ends which capture the rails and ends. The ends also serve the ladder as well. I sealed all the lumber and applied the customers requested stain; Minwax Semitransparent Classic Grey followed by a small application of PolyU.Once at the customers house, I finished the assembly – two ends, two bed frames (rails and ends), four safety rails, 22 bed slats and four Oak upright caps with a small bit of stenciling. The daughter is happy, grandkids are happy so all good here. I already made my daughters King size bed and my granddaughters twin bed. So, this rounds out the family.
Thanks for checking out the Bunk beds for the twins.



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Jupiter

Furnished content.
(from Lumberjocks.com)


JupiterJupiter - a SuminboBefore we get into what this project is, Why Jupiter?Jupiter has two small moons Adrastea and Metis, which orbit the mysterious planet within its characteristic ring. They are thought to be the source of the 'dust' which forms the ring.So Jupiters and its ring provided the inspiration for the name of the box which is a follow on for my Starry, starry night box – see it here.The lift off lid, held in place with a traditional obijimi sash, is veneered marine ply, with book matched burl elm on the outside and jarrah edging, with paulownia veneer on the inside. It has a dyed black band, Jupiter's ring, running across the top and down the ends. This is inlayed with a range of small shell and opal dots, and two larger cabochon stud earrings, Jupiter's moons – Adrastea and Metis.But, what is the box? Continuing with my Japanese inspired boxes, this is a traditional writing box - Suminbo, It is used to hold a range of tools and equipment associated with Japanese calligraphy – Shado. It is a little more complex than my previous Suzuribako, check it out here. Its design was based on earlier wrting boxes which also held calligraphy paper so needed to be larger.The main box/base and the internal writing tray, Suzuribako, are made from cherry.The lift-out Suzuribako contains calligraphy traditional tools. An Inkstone – Suzuri, a water dropper – Mizusashi, two brushes – Fude, and a brush rest – Fude oki.It seems that in times gone bye people had to make their own tools in order to practice shodo, but today you can find all the necessary objects in stores across Japan or other countries. I got most of mine from AliExpress. Though the Suzuri - inkstone, and the Sumi - inkstick, where given to me be the eventual recipent of the box – little did he know he would get them back!The inside of the Suzuribako tray and its interior framework have been ebonised and then sprinkled with gold dust to reflect traditional Japanese black lacquer.I use polyurethane instead of traditional lacquer - urushi. A couple of coats are applied and rubbed down, then another coat is applied, and while still wet the gold dust, or you can use fine glitter, is sprinkled on. This is left to dry after which I brush off any loose dust before applying another two or three coats of polyurethane to cover the gold dust. I then rub it down with 400 grit and apply more coats until the gold dust is completely sealed and I can rub it down get a flat satin finish.Beneath the Suzuribako in the base of the box are more traditional items. All of which have their own specific Japanese names.Two paper weights – Bunchin, made from Mexican Rosewood with shell dot inlays and grooves to act as brush rests. A paper knife - Pepanaifu. A brush hanger - Burashihanga, for hanging cleaned brushes after they have been cleaned to allow them to dry. A solid inkstick - Sumi in its own paulownia box. Also included is an uncarved soap stone seal – Hanko.Making boxes that have a specific purpose and hold set items is more challenging than making an empty box. Things have to fit, and fit in particular positions, so the internal layout and associated sizes and tolerances have to be precise and carefully built into the design. Many of my boxes are just empty containers - you put in what you want and arrange things as best you can. So finished sizes don't really matter, and a few millimetres discrepancy form the original sizes are OK.The whole box is gift wrapped in a traditional Furoshiki cloth.It was made as a surprise for a very good Japanese friend who has given me so much encouragement, and help with translations while researching many of my Japanese boxes. Thank you Tad!As ever thanks for looking, and if you have nay questions please ask.Hope you enjoyed it



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