The Woodshop Shed

adventures in woodworking and home maintenance, from my shop in an oversized backyard shed

September 2021
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Live Edge Charcuterie Boards

Furnished content.
(from Lumberjocks.com)


Live Edge Charcuterie Boards I had a random piece of figured maple that was 3 – 4 inches wide. I cut it into three pieces and jointed them on the Shopsmith jointer, the outside boards were jointed on only one edge, the center board board on both sides. Then I ran them through the porter cable planer. After verifying the edges were straight and they were the same thickness and flat, I glued them up using Tight Bond III since they will be subject to water. I constructed cauls out of garage door tracks and used them to make sure the boards were flat. Simultaneously, I used three bar clamps to tighten the boards. The result was a plank that had about a 32 of an inch variance. To eliminate that I used the Shopsmith disk sander with 150 grit in the drill press position and carefully sanded the board. It was hard to control, so I cut them in half as my intention was to make to boards. When I got the glue and joint variances out, I used my random orbital sander starting at 60 grit and moving up to 320. I raised the grain with alcohol and sanded to 400 grit. I used General Finish Water Based Greystone stain on the live edges to make the grain stand out, and sanded them smooth. I then blended a mixture of bees wax and mineral oil at about a 30% wax and 70% oil mixture, and buffed it out with a clean cloth. After that I took my orbital sander and put a Master Pro 6” Wet Dry Sanding Disk 3,000 grit, it has a foam back to stick to the sander and buffed it some more. Then I put the feet on it, I got them at Wood Craft and the handles I got a Hobby Lobby, I made sure that the handles could be fastened with screws from the top. I will probably sell them at a craft show. I've never sold anything before, I'm thinking about $60.00 each..



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posted at: 12:00am on 03-Sep-2021
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Cedar Stool - I got the Leftovers!

Furnished content.
(from Lumberjocks.com)


Cedar Stool - I got the Leftovers!  My son made a beautiful Natural cedar bar at their lake house! The slabs were 2 thick x 22 W x 10' L and he had a few nice hunks leftover and he gave me one!
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He gave me a nice short slab cut off (see photo) to take back to Florida with me after a visit with him and family in NC. I didn't really need it or know what to do with it and double DD suggested me make a river table (good idea Dave no room here for that)!!! So for a while the slab was just collecting dust in the shop. Than I thought maybe Alan and Cathy would like a little stool behind the bar made of the same wood he made the bar from.
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.Well Anyway I made this stool using that thick 2” slab cut off. I dimensioned just enough wood to produce the stool!
I also put two purple heart inlays in the seat top; the color goes really well with the red cedar. Alan and his wife Cathy will put the finish on it.
.Hope you like it!

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posted at: 12:00am on 03-Sep-2021
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Decorative Beetle Kill Ponderosa Pine Vase

Furnished content.
(from Lumberjocks.com)


Decorative Beetle Kill Ponderosa Pine VaseThis one was an experiment all the way through the process.I started by choosing a firewood block/round big enough to maybe kinda sorta end up like I hoped it would end up but with no guarantee because I ain't really good at carving with a chainsaw:Then, I tried a chainsaw plunge cut that I've never tried before:The hard part was being able to get down into the well of this vase to smooth the sides using a variety of tools to do so. Fortunately, I had the tools including a long neck die electric die grinder with a SaburrTooth cup rasp and SandBoss inflatable drum sander to smooth the inside.After that, it was a simple matter of shaping the outside of the vase using a combination of carving discs and sanding drums to get the tapered shape of the vase.The final result is a 16 inch high vase with a 10 inch deep well.Feedback is appreciated.
TZH



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Fish Eye & Silicone

Furnished content.
(from Popularwoodworking.com)


The truth behind craters and ridges. If your finishing career has been limited to finishing projects you have made, you may never have experienced fish eye. But if you have done much refinishing, especially of furniture, you have surely …Source

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