The Woodshop Shed

adventures in woodworking and home maintenance, from my shop in an oversized backyard shed

July 2021
Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
       


Contemporary Desk - Cherry

Furnished content.
(from Lumberjocks.com)


Contemporary Desk - CherryI'll post this with the hope of inspiring others to tackle curves and arcs in their work; also, for those who want to challenge themselves to meet functional issues in a less conventional build.Designing and working with curves significantly increases the attention to precise layout, the need to think in 3 dimensions, to consider racking and loading, and to execute to well-considered plan. As with most of my projects, the actual woodworking time is less than half of the time spent on the build.This desk is a modified version of one that I posted some time ago, and it gave me the opportunity to revisit both the tools that I used and the methods to achieve similar results. It was not my intent to revisit this design; however, the client was insistent.For those interested in this type of design and construction, I'll go through some of the considerations
The most challenging aspect of the contemporary desk is the 6 legs (3 leg-sets): they need to be identical in length and span, the bottoms must be parallel to the tops (the tops' centerline is offset 10” from the bottom's centerline), and racking is an important consideration given that the tops span 22” (Leg Span), while the bottom of each legs set is slightly more than 4” - the downward load on the legs is spread wide from the feet supporting the arc. Also, the tops and bottoms are held by floating tenons, requiring precise layout in the mating surfaces - when the legs' mortises seat in the tenons, the bottoms and tops must be flush.From a design perspective, the overall leg set spread must sit within (and be placed equidistant) from the desktop edge - which then determines the location of the corresponding leg bottom. Each leg set is braced by a 1/4 10 'spacer', that is dado'd into interior sides – structurally, this provide significant racking strength. This dado needs to be created while the legs has a straight reference edge (that is, not after the arches are cut).There are some Art-Deco design elements - the leg sets rest on small plinths, which then sit on the primary plinth; though my intention here is not necessarily to pay homage to Art-Deco - the visual effect is what I'm shooting for.
The other challenge are the 4 risers (Desktop - to - Shelf), in that, they are held (top & bottom) by floating tenons, and are angled toward the seater's position: as designed, when seated in a typical typing position - approximately 3' from the shelf, each riser is inline with the typist's line-of-sight. For decorative purposes, the risers are 4” at the top, and via a progressive arch, reduce to 3” at the Desktop.The final challenge is the layout and routing of the Domino mortises: in the main plinth, secondary plinths, and leg sets. The Festool Domino is an excellent horizontal mortiser, but is not well-suited for vertical work: with some patience and much layout and clamping, it can be precisely done.The finish is two coats Zinnser Sealcoat and 4 coats Deft Waterborne Clear Acrylic (Gloss); sprayed with a Fuji HVLP setup: I highly recommend each of these components. The Sealcoat portion needs to be done with care, as the product will dry in the gun and in the cup (at least mine did) - you need to have denatured alcohol ready to shoot through the gun as soon as you finish each Sealcoat application. The Acrylic, being waterborne, cleans with water sprayed through the gun. Between coats, I wet sanded (Abranet) with 600 grit, and buffed after the final top coat. I have failed in my attempts to brush or wipe-on finishes; for all of the time and effort that goes into each build, I was never happy with the finishing process - the Fuji sprayer has solved this.The Desktop and Shelf, as well as the main plinth, have gentle (110” radius) arc. From a build consideration, the sweep of the arc must be considered when laying out the Legset spread it would be easy to cut-away the very wood needed to capture the top of the legset.I have purposely allowed variations in wood color, grain pattern, tight knots, and live edge blemishes to be part of the project. Though I have grain-matched where possible (I started with an 18” wide board), I'm not one to discard structurally-sound wood simply because it has a knot or a blemish in it.The finished Desktop is 27” from the floor – a client request; and it is 48” wide.There are many nuances that I'm skipping-over; but overall, this is a very buildable project. If I can address any questions, please feel free to inquire.
MJCD



Read more here

posted at: 12:00am on 29-Jul-2021
path: /Woodworking | permalink | edit (requires password)

Comments:
0 comments, click here to add the first



Signature board for wedding

Furnished content.
(from Lumberjocks.com)


Signature board for weddingA friend at work is getting married soon, and they wanted a signature board like they were seeing on Pintrest and places like that. He showed me a picture of a plywood board with the name on it and asked if I could do something like that. I said I could, but I would not. I told him he could cut his own board with a jigsaw and sand it up and do it himself if he just wanted a plywood board. He asked what I would do and I told him. The two of them came over to the shop a few days later to pick out some wood that they liked, and decided on the quartersawn white oak. They wanted the writing area 28×32. I got it made up, and had them pick out a font that they liked. I told them to choose one that was not to thin because it would be to hard to work with. They had no concept of what thin was. I lasered out the one that they chose and it was a disaster. It broke apart in several places. I chose a few other fonts and cut them some samples out of scrap. I thought that the name should be smaller to leave more room to sign, but they marked out on the board how big they wanted the name and that is what they got.
I like the way it turned out, even if I think the name it to big.QS white oak with Arm R Seal satin. Name is cut from 1/8” baltic birch plywood with stain. My most difficult task was gluing the name and date on. Trying to get enough but not too much glue, dropping it in place so the glue did not smear around, weighing it down without moving it, and making sure everything was properly aligned. But it came out OK.



Read more here

posted at: 12:00am on 29-Jul-2021
path: /Woodworking | permalink | edit (requires password)

Comments:
0 comments, click here to add the first



Gnomes

Furnished content.
(from Lumberjocks.com)


GnomesA group shot of the GLM Movement Gnomes along with a photo of the 30 Gnomes that I will be contributing to SWAT for banquet table pieces. Our club is hoping to contribute 80 Gnomes to SWAT.Bobby
Louisiana



Read more here

posted at: 12:00am on 29-Jul-2021
path: /Woodworking | permalink | edit (requires password)

Comments:
0 comments, click here to add the first



July 2021
Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
       


Promoted by Feed Shark





RSS (site)  RSS (path)

ATOM (site)  ATOM (path)

Categories
 - blog home

 - Announcements  (0)
 - Annoyances  (0)
 - For_Sale  (0)
 - Home_and_Garden  (0)
 - Humor  (0)
 - Industry_News  (0)
 - Massachusetts_USA  (0)
     - Swansea  (0)
 - Notices  (0)
 - Observations  (0)
 - Oddities  (0)
 - Privacy  (1)
 - Reading  (0)
     - Books  (0)
     - Ebooks  (0)
     - Magazines  (0)
     - Online_Articles  (0)
 - Reviews  (1)
 - Rhode_Island_USA  (0)
     - Providence  (0)
 - Shop  (0)
     - Planes  (1)
 - Shop_Improvements  (2)
 - Woodworking  (5454)
     - Projects  (2)
     - Resources  (3)
     - Techniques  (179)
     - Tips  (0)
     - Videos  (7)


Archives
 -2021  October  (64)
 -2021  September  (105)
 -2021  August  (109)
 -2021  July  (112)
 -2021  June  (107)
 -2021  May  (115)
 -2021  April  (128)
 -2021  March  (133)
 -2021  February  (115)
 -2021  January  (105)
 -2020  December  (87)
 -2020  November  (84)
 -2020  October  (87)


My Sites

 - Millennium3Publishing.com

 - SponsorWorks.net

 - ListBug.com

 - TextEx.net

 - FindAdsHere.com

 - VisitLater.com