The Woodshop Shed

adventures in woodworking and home maintenance, from my shop in an oversized backyard shed

September 2020
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Making an adaptor to change a felt bag dust collector to use a cartridge

Furnished content.
(from Lumberjocks.com)


Making an adaptor to change a felt bag dust collector to use a cartridgeAs a result of envying Keith Brown's new dust collector https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nC7_fgojpy4&t=0s because it has a cartridge – which besides collecting even smaller dust particles also has internal paddles for shaking off the accumulated dust (I have to whack my felt bag with a stick whilst wearing breathing apparatus) – I searched once more for a cartridge to fit my Scheppach HD12, but again could not find one that was the right size. I wondered if it would be feasible to make an adaptor ring for a larger cartridge, but it seemed that it might be an expensive experiment if it did not work. However, during my cartridge searches I stumbled across and article by Stephen Finch – http://www.stephenfinch.co.uk/workshop-blog/2020/6/27/upgrading-an-axminster-ade1200-with-a-cartridge-filter – which covered exactly what I envisaged, for a DC which has an even smaller bag. I sent my thanks to Stephen, and ordered the Charnwood CF159 cartridge.As usual, I forgot to take photo's during construction, but there are plenty in Stephen's article. I glued up a sandwich of some odd 19mm MDF and plywood boards, with a thinner sheet of plywood in the middle to thicken up the result slightly, and laid out the circles for my machine (300 mm) and the internal diameter of the cartridge (370mm). I thought of using a router jig set up, but ended up machining carefully on my bandsaw – cutting through at an angle to get to the inner diameter as with bandsaw boxes. Just as well I took that route as I had to enlarge the 300mm hole to get the ring to fit, so there would have been no centre location hole available for a recut with a router jig. The picture shown above displays the left-over pieces – the ring itself being hidden inside the finished machine because I didn't want to disassemble it for photo's.It was necessary to cut notches in the ring to accommodate the ends of the cross plate in which the paddle axle rotates, and I found that an oscillating multi tool provided the simplest and most effective solution to this sort of cutting. I also sprayed the ring all over with sanding sealer just in case this would help.When I first tested the fitted cartridge, as expected a little air and dust blew out at the bottom of the assembly, because my amended inner 300mm hole did not fit tightly to the lip where the felt bag was previously attached. This was easily corrected by the application of some mastic sealant to fill the gaps, which, even before it was allowed to harden, remained stable throughout testing. The external circle had not needed adjustment and fitted in the rubber outer sleeve well, so was completely sealed by the supplied spring-loaded retaining band.Although I am delighted with the result, I do not apologise for plagarising Stephen's article as I think it deserves the wider audience that Lumberjocks might bring as there may be others who would like to do make a similar adaptor to improve their own dust collector.



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posted at: 12:00am on 23-Sep-2020
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another batch of A&C styled lamps

Furnished content.
(from Lumberjocks.com)


another batch of A&C styled lampsGreetings!This is what I've been spending weekends over the summer working on.They are very similar to the previous lamps I built with a few exceptions so I won't deep dive into the details as much (see the previous project post for more gritty detail)I've changed a few of my jig designs and added several more, but this will be the last of this inlay design I make for a while as I dream up new and more painful challenges 8^)Glam photos follow below.I made four this time since they are good sellers and with the sometimes complex tool and jig setups, it just made sense to batch them out.
I certainly saved some time, but OMG, cutting all these parts was mentally draining!Here are some numbers:Total wood parts per lamp
shade: 32
stem: 21
base: 21
total: 74That's almost 300 parts to cut, shape, glue, sand, route etc. Ugh!
I keep fairly careful records and the material costs for everything runs about $120 per lamp
The mica, lamp cluster, and fabric wrapped “vintage” power cord make up nearly 1/2 of this.Anyhoo, enough complaining.
The two inlay wood types are birdseye maple and Bolivian rosewood. Lamp body is walnut, mostly rift sawn.
Poplar makes the stem core and a plug for the base just to save some coin on expensive walnut.A difference this time is I saved many hours by not applying a top coat finish, everything was oiled and waxed. This has convinced me to give some of those “hardwax oils” a try in the future. This was just plain Watco and Minwhacks “special” dark. I went through some pains to avoid getting any oil on the inlays since the oil would really darken and obscure the woods, especially the rosewood.I used splines to reinforce the base sections, probably overkill but since I want these to last a long time and the base is all mitered sections, splines it would be.They are made from the same wood as the inlays, serendipity!The above photo really shows how the light angle changes the woods appearance, it was all cut from the same board.The shade hold down is super solid and the top finial nut was actually easy to make. A tip o' the hat to Dave Polaschek. and Pete (PPK) for suggesting the finial style last time 8^)I've experimented with different stay designs on each iteration, knowing full well that the style I used here is really what I should have used all along:Even though they are effectively hidden under the shade, these “class up” the exposed edges better than a bead of silicone or hot melt. They are made from 1/4” walnut with a chamfer along the face so the brads used to retain them penetrate the frame at a useful angle.I drilled 176 total pilot holes through all 64 stays (three brads per stay, two on the top) using the drill press and a very tiny bit. The 5/8” brads were pressed into the pilot holes and with some grunt work, pushed into place with a small nail set (no hammering required).Thanks for looking and any comments!



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posted at: 12:00am on 23-Sep-2020
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Oak and maple small table

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(from Lumberjocks.com)


Oak and maple small tableSolid oak and maple
18 X 18 kind of thought it up on my own.



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posted at: 12:00am on 23-Sep-2020
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