The Woodshop Shed

adventures in woodworking and home maintenance, from my shop in an oversized backyard shed

July 2020
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Thursday's Therapy

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(from Lumberjocks.com)


Thursday's Therapy Well I made it through a very long Thursday. Hoping Friday will not be nearly as long time wise or mental wise. Made it a point though to get myself into the shop and turn 4 of the 8 of these that needed.
Interia pens are a fun kit and quick kit to turn. Have a client that loves the fidget factor of these.Look forward to tomorrow's shop time.CtL



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posted at: 12:00am on 31-Jul-2020
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Screen door with built-in dog door.

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Screen door with built-in dog door.The old screen door wasn't cutting it, so I designed and built a new screen door with an integrated dog door. When I find the time, hopefully I will get around to closing the old dog door off to actually finish the project.I have the plans for the door on my site:
https://famousartisan.com/screen-door-with-dog-door/



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posted at: 12:00am on 31-Jul-2020
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Mahogany hamper with first carvings

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Mahogany hamper with first carvingsI had some left over mahogany. We needed a new clothes hamper. I wanted to learn to carve. This is the results. There is a carving on both sides.



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posted at: 12:00am on 31-Jul-2020
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Wednesday's Whistles

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Wednesday's WhistlesOkay, Doing good so far got 3 for 3. Tonight's project was getting 5 Secret Compartment whistles completed. These are already spoken for so was happy to get them done. I still have a number of pieces left to do for the order and will plan to knock out a couple of them tomorrow and Friday. So hopefully you'll see at lest one of them tomorrow night.Enjoy all.CtL



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posted at: 12:00am on 30-Jul-2020
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Turntable stereo cabinet

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Turntable stereo cabinet This project has been a want to do for sometime and hopefully can be passed down to the kids. I got my vintage gear back out all of which average 40+ years but all are in great condition including the SX -950 receiver which was recently reworked.The Cabinet is 62 long and 18 deep for each section. The top is 10 high with the lower 18 high. Both sections done with 3/4 birch plywood with 1/4 walnut for the outer layer.I used enduro – var satin for the final coat with some coats of wax.
The feet are 4 segments to give the cabinet some separation.e



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posted at: 12:00am on 30-Jul-2020
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More toys

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More toysI made a few more toys
I made a new prototype car for the club toy give away. They are about 4 1/2×6 inches, pine car with green poplar wheels
A few Monster trucks and a bunch of mini monster trucks



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posted at: 12:00am on 30-Jul-2020
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3D endgrain cutting boards

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3D endgrain cutting boardsOccasionally I make these 3D endgrain cutting boards as gifts for friends and family. Recently my daughter in law asked me if I would make some for all the members of her cheese making club down in the San Francisco Bay Area.
I said sure and then found out the club had 10 members so having already committed myself I went to work. Lot of sawing, gluing, planing, and sanding later I completed the project. Wood is maple, Purple Heart, and African Sapele and the finish is Howard Butcher Block Conditioner. To make it even more interesting I shipped them down by FedEx and the package got lost for 2 days. Everything finally worked out and the club was very pleased.
A special acknowledgement to MTM Wooodworking in Russia who does some great YouTube videos explaining how to make these boards.



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posted at: 12:00am on 29-Jul-2020
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Barn Wood Big Green Egg Table

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Barn Wood Big Green Egg Table My metal Big Green Egg (BGE) table that I bought with the egg rusted out
Decided to build a custom table using salvaged barn wood. After planing, I asked for help identifying the wood. The concensus from several lumberjacks was old white oak.
The wood was plenty hard, consuming 2 sets of hss planer blades and a carbide roster bit.I reused the stainless top from my old table but wanting additional table space I added a 13 butcher block of wood scraps I had. ( 13 because that's the extent of my planer). 3/4 oak ply for the bge support. 2×4 and 2×6 frameFinished with golden oak stain and 3 coats of spar polyurethane. The table will be covered when not in use.Thanks for looking



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posted at: 12:00am on 29-Jul-2020
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My boy

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My boyIn an attempt to get my son interested in wood work he was asked to design something that I would make. He chose an Ottoman and this what he came up with.The internal storage was his idea. I think the intention is it is for storage of gaming discs (XBox). He has a few.Now that it finished his mum has grabbed it for her TV lounging, so he might be lucky to get it back.Maybe I should get him to design number two in the series.The timber is recycled pine with finger joints on the corners.Recycled timber draw knobs for the feet. Amazing how much is thrown away with kerb side pickup.



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posted at: 12:00am on 29-Jul-2020
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Maple Vessel Completed

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Maple Vessel CompletedI posted this a couple of weeks ago but without the lid. The lid is finished and this is the completed project.



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posted at: 12:00am on 28-Jul-2020
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Drawbridge Screens For Tomato Trellis

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Drawbridge Screens For Tomato TrellisHi All,
A couple of years ago, I added a project to LJ that showed a tomato trellis that I built out of cypress.
Well, I have been having trouble with stink bugs ruining my tomatoes the past two summers, so I decided to build some screens that would be light weight, easy to open up and also would be strong enough to take the abuse year after year.
I got the idea from a drawbridge and I have to say it works really well.
They are all made out of fir lumber and finished with 3 coats of spar varnish. There is a foam rubber seal on the bottom and in between the screens.
No more stink bugs!



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posted at: 12:00am on 28-Jul-2020
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Moon and Stars (Walnut Box)

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Moon and Stars (Walnut Box)Each of these was my first projects using my cove jig. Much sanding for end result but learning as I go. This is the second time doing the brass inlay ( different sizes). For the lid star accents . The white epoxy was mixed with some opal flakes which created a neat color spectrum in the moon-I had a buddy perform the engraving since I don't have a CNC machine yet.Each box is 4 tall and is 12 x 10



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posted at: 12:00am on 28-Jul-2020
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Small Greene & Greene style box

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Small Greene & Greene style boxHere's a small G&G box with proud finger joints I made for a night light stand. It's intended to match the style of the dresser. The finger joints on the front act as a pull for a small drawer. Wonder what my wife will put in there, maybe more jewelry? :)



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posted at: 12:00am on 27-Jul-2020
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Chair for GK3

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Chair for GK3The third grand kid gets the third child's rocker. There a few 'firsts' here. It's my first project made out of white ash.
My first project working with raw leather. And the first with the type of joinery I used to connect the legs to the rockers. The joinery is certainly not perfect, but I'm not either, so that's okay. It's pretty solid and I think it will last a long time. Ash is still plentiful, but I don't know for how much longer as the Emerald Ash Borer continues to spread across the country. The finish is Arm-R-Seal—no stain.
I was recently gifted a 6''x 72'' edge belt sander that I definitely took advantage of here.
I like the way it turned out and hopefully my grandson will enjoy it also.



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posted at: 12:00am on 27-Jul-2020
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Wood Tongs

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Wood TongsI had the pleasure of sending my swap submission to Dave P from Santa Fe NM. I had been wanting to make myself some new tongs so it was a great choice.
There's not a lot to them really, 2 sides and a wedge. The wedge angle took some trial and error though!
Once I rough cut the blanks for the sides I put them together with carpet tape and cut them to shape then refined them with a combination of belt, spindle and edge sanders plus some hand finessing.
The longer ones are about 16” long and the small ones are perfect for appetizers/garnishes. They're figured maple and black walnut.



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posted at: 12:00am on 27-Jul-2020
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Wine Barrel Stool #3

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Wine Barrel Stool #3Hi:Today I completed the third in a series of wine barrel bar stools for our home. Each is unique, as I made changes to the design, improvising along the way.This chair is 3 shorter than the first two, and utilizes a wine barrel lid for the seat.
The arms were made from three laminated strips of stirring sticks found inside the barrel.Over all, the chair is 28 tall at the seat, 19 wide and 19 deep. The feet are 22 apart.I use #12 and #14 screws as fasteners. The chair is finished with Varathane professional satin.All the wood is white oak, with a deep burgundy colour (and fragrance). This wood is a joy to work with.Instead of using a barrel hoop for the foot rest, I chose to use barrel stave sections. They make for a more comfortable foot rest.The chair also has a swivel mechanism, purchased from Lee Valley. Excellent quality swivel.Hope you enjoy the photos.



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posted at: 12:00am on 26-Jul-2020
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Jeep Clock lamps

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Jeep Clock lampsJuts finished. Woodworking, 3D Printing, Electrical and plastics!



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posted at: 12:00am on 26-Jul-2020
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Guitar amp box

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Guitar amp box A friend of mine asked me to make a box for the amp or head from a combo guitar amp. He said he didn't care what it looked like and left the design up to me. I figured I'd have a little fun with some maple & walnut and finger joints. The finish is a mixture of oil and polyurethane. He's pretty thrilled with it.



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posted at: 12:00am on 26-Jul-2020
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Finally Made Myself a Mallet

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Finally Made Myself a MalletWell, I did it…. I made myself a mallet. Not particularly special, except to me. And the design isn't unique either, but I believe I built it well and it'll be useful for a long time. I made this entirely from scraps and cutoffs I had laying around. But what was cool, was that I could remember the project where nearly every scrap came from. (Not exactly sure what that says about me, however.) The mallet's head is made from two pieces of QS white oak with some jatoba sandwiched between them. The handle is made from QS sycamore. And I used some small bits of walnut to secure the head to the handle. I finished it with BLO.



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posted at: 12:00am on 25-Jul-2020
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Warre Garden Hive

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Warre Garden HiveI finally took the plunge into beekeeping. Inspired by the book “The Idle Beekeeper” I dove in with my woodworking interest and built 2 Warre hives. I used 5/4 pine 'hobby panels' from the local lumberyard to skip a lot of edge-gluing. Much reading and research produced numerous free plans for the main hive. I used several variations by adding windows to each box, screened bottom boards, modified triangular top bars with 1/2 sides, top screens, stands and also built a feeder box (not pictured). I finished the first one and stocked it with a 3 lb. package of bees and a queen the end of June. 3 weeks later it has 2 full boxes of bees and comb and is going strong. The woodworking was not formidable but it was my first project using metric measurements. It is finished only on the outside with 2 coats of linseed oil. It is an interesting project, not only to build something new, but also make sure that is appealing to humans (a great addition to the garden) and make sure it is healthy for the bees.



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posted at: 12:00am on 25-Jul-2020
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Maple and Walnut Lamination

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Maple and Walnut LaminationBorrowed this design from Perry McDaniel's article in an old router book.



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posted at: 12:00am on 25-Jul-2020
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Shourou Garden Feature

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Shourou Garden FeatureI made this cedar belfry as a garden feature in my wife's flower garden. It is all red cedar, with cypress pegs and wedges. No metal in the frame, but plenty of brads in the roof. I cut all of the joinery by hand, if you count drilling out mortises with a cordless drill to be “by hand” . It took me about six full workdays in the garage.



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posted at: 12:00am on 24-Jul-2020
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White Ash Vase

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White Ash VaseThis White Ash vase was a bit of a challenge … the blank was irregular in shape, severely out of balance, and had rotted in the center leaving some nasty voids.I glued large waste blocks to both ends, which gave me some latitude in finding an axis to turn on. Some of the interior voids were pretty deep and close to the finished exterior profile so I had to take extreme care while hollowing to keep from blowing out the sides.It is 9-1/2 inches tall, 4 inches in diameter, with segmented walnut rings for the top and base. Finish is 2 coats of oil, followed by five coats of satin poly.I have a Oneway Bowl Steady that helps dampen vibration and used a Harrison Simple Hollower to take out the interior.



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posted at: 12:00am on 24-Jul-2020
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Garden shed

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Garden shedMy neighbor saw me build my shed, so she wanted one in her back yard, as she did a lot of gardening. She went out to a recycle place and purchased a lot of materials to begin her project. When she got everything assembled, she looked at the pile and realized he had no idea where to begin. That's when she made a neighborly visit and ask if I could help. Turned out I built it and she watched. I didn't mind using the reclaimed material but the door and windows she purchased were not framed, so that took some extra work. I built her a bench on the inside and ran an electrical line so she could listen to her country music as she did her potting. She was one happy gardener.



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posted at: 12:00am on 23-Jul-2020
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Oversized Mechanical Phone Holder

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Oversized Mechanical Phone HolderJust a personal scrap bin challenge to build myself a phone holder for my desk.I have seen ones available online and in stores and figured I could have a bit of fun with the project.All the wood came from my off cut bins, with just cutting pieces to length to make it work.The top mechanics operate the volume controls inside. The flappy looking thing on front pushes the home button to turn it on or return to home when already in use.Its more novelty then function because of its sheer size, however, watching a little video while at an art show tends to make for an interesting conversation starter!For me. making little things like this are like a gift, born of the precious offcuts that accumulate in a puzzle shop.I would love to see what other wacky creations other have made, lol.Have a rockin' day folks!



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posted at: 12:00am on 23-Jul-2020
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Quilting room cabinets with leaded glass doors

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Quilting room cabinets with leaded glass doors I made my wife cabinets for her quilting room. We made leaded glass panels in some quilt block pattern designs.



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posted at: 12:00am on 23-Jul-2020
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Superb in

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Superb in These birds have been hand carved and painted with acrylic gouache and finished with a layer of wax for protection. I have found that using polyurethane has a darkening effect on the paint work and I loose all the highlights and vibrancy of the painting.
This is a link to a video of them all.
Pair of Superb parrots
https://youtu.be/-1DS-zum-nESingle superb parrot.
https://youtu.be/-1DS-zum-nEFor more photos and other work check out my Facebook or Instagram pages.
treasuresatderrymore
https://www.instagram.com/treasures_at_derrymore?r=nametag



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posted at: 12:00am on 22-Jul-2020
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Laptop stand

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Laptop standMy latest little woodworking project – I made a laptop stand for myself. After making a desk for my daughter, she stole the plastic, store-bought laptop stand I had on my desk. So, I decided to make myself one.It's Birch plywood and Bradford Pear.It was the first time I'd used Bradford Pear for anything. Bought 1 little board a while back on a lark, and finally got around to using a bit of it. I really like it. Finished with SealCoat and GF High Performance. Made it extra tall to fit my desk setup.



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posted at: 12:00am on 22-Jul-2020
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Box 1

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Box 1Paduak and Walnut.



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posted at: 12:00am on 22-Jul-2020
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Stars Stripes & Dirt Track Nights

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Stars Stripes & Dirt Track NightsThis was my 1st paying project i had made my dad one for fathers day he shared it to his social media & i had people wanting me to build them one i used 1×4s joined together with a biscuit joiner & i carved each individual star with a dremel & a chisel… Thanks for checking out my 1st build i will add a few others ive completed later! Im no professional just a mom of 4 trying to work this side hussle as the teenagers call it now days lol



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posted at: 12:00am on 21-Jul-2020
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Fighter Planes

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Fighter PlanesAnd I still can cut and glue things, its seems. :)
Its been a while since i did a project by my own, since i got the laser cutter its been more business oriented than fun things. these planes are a lot of fun for me to do. in fact, that F-16 Fighter was the first wooden toy we made with my Dad and my wife a long time ago.i still used the laser machine to make the wheels and the details in the other plane.the F-16 its from the book “The great All-American Wooden Toy Book” and the other fighter is from Steve Good
Everything is in Honduran mahogany.thanks for reading. be safe please.



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posted at: 12:00am on 21-Jul-2020
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Bandsaw Box #5

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Bandsaw Box #5I keep trying to perfect these boxes. Never satisfied!



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posted at: 12:00am on 21-Jul-2020
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My first "high end" pen

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My first "high end" penSo this is my first “High End” pen. I've been doing a bunch lately and enjoying them. A lot have been from blanks that I poured, or hybrids. I was lucky enough to get a piece of Cocobolo Burl though, so I wanted to get in a few practice pen first. The kit that will end up on the Cocobolo Burl is an Imperal Fountain from Dayacom, so that will get shown once I get the drill bits in for this kit.This is a Redwood Lace Burl that I stabilized. the kit is a Nouveau Sceptre Fountain Pen Kit in Black Titanium & 22KT. Sanded to 600 grit before doing 10 coats of CA. 5 coats were Mercury Flex thin, the other 5 were Mercury Flex medium. After this dried, it got a complete micromesh treatment and then polished with some Maguires #7.Next for practice, will be a Black Ash Burl on a Statesman roller ball, another somewhat medium/high end kit. Maybe a few more Virage fountains too.I can in all honesty say, writing with a $30 kit like this one and a $6-$10 kit like the ones I was making previously is like night and day.Rich



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posted at: 12:00am on 20-Jul-2020
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Casket for a dog.

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Casket for a dog.This was an unusual request for me. My Sister in law has a very old dog. Well over 17 years old and getting in bad health and getting close to passing. She asked me if I could make a box to bury the dog in. Just a box. I told her it would be my honor. I decided “just a box” would not do. A special dog deserves a special box. This is what I came up with. Still simple but with added touches such as a good finish, a cross and padded inside made it a little better. The dog is a yorkshire terrier, small dog but I needed to size it. I drove my cats crazy measuring them. About the same size. Thanks for looking.



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posted at: 12:00am on 20-Jul-2020
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Desk for my teenage daughter

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Desk for my teenage daughterWith my kids doing virtual school instead of in person, my 13 year old daughter really needed a desk. So, I built this for her. It's made from birch plywood and poplar. She specified that she wanted the drawers and the keyboard tray, and she wanted it painted white to match her room. Sadly, it took me longer than I'd wanted to build, so she didn't actually get it until the last week of school. But they'll be doing virtual learning again in the Fall, so it'll get a lot more use then.



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posted at: 12:00am on 20-Jul-2020
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Future proof Clamp Rack

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Future proof Clamp RackAt least I hope it is :)I have seen a clamp rack of this style for a while. When I saw this one from TungOil I finally deciced it was time.I originally planned on a rack of similar size but I ended up adding enough capacity to fill the space available. I then chose to cover all the plywood edges with hardwood similar to my other projects . The trim work more than doubled the time required but I like the result.The 1st 3 photos are of the new rack.
The 4th one is of the old rack at full capacity. The C-clamps on the bottom rail were so heavy that the rail was pulling out of the wall.
The 5th one is of the clamps that didn't fit on the old rack.
The last shot is a build pic.I have enough extra space to cover more than twice the clamps I already have. HOPEFULLY it will be a long time before I run out of space!



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posted at: 12:00am on 19-Jul-2020
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Horse marquetry

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Horse marquetryI started this picture once and got so frustrated I gave up for a while. I sent a picture of it such as it was to my sister (it's her horse) and she said “I love it. Don't get rid of it!” So I kept it around and finally came back to it. Here's what I ended up with. I don't hate it anymore.
The frame is from some walnut I've had sitting around foryears. The person I bought it from said it was from a barn in Pennsylvania from around the turn of the century (not the current one). Beautiful wood. Hard to imagine using it on a barn. Anyway it seemed like a fitting wood to use for a horse picture.
The second picture is another one I did of her horse after I gave up on the other picture. It was much easier to do a wide shot and not have to worry about the face details. Kind of a cop out I know. The background was a piece of veneer that I was saving for just the right picture.George



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posted at: 12:00am on 18-Jul-2020
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TALKING MUSHROOMS - 3 - Not Mush Room!

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TALKING MUSHROOMS - 3 - Not Mush Room!More spalted birch only difference is the diameter size, hence the mushrooms are longer due to the extra thickness
when compared to the last group of carvings. The spalting is more dramatic!
Mounted on a sculpted walnut base the arrangement of the mushrooms was challenging but I was striving for a tight grouping as one would see in the wild. Many titles came to my head and I was stymied when out of the blue my wife Marjorie met the challenge and yelled – 'Not Mush Room!' It stuck! Thank you Marjorie!Enjoy!Roman, the Bootman, also the Mushroom Man.



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posted at: 12:00am on 18-Jul-2020
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Damascus Knife with Custom Scales

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Damascus Knife with Custom ScalesDamascus Steel knife with spalted Cherry scales I casted with aluminum honeycomb and epoxy tinted with green mica pigment. Then cut and book matched the scales. For my buddy Rik from Old Souls Custom Creations in North Carolina. I laser engraved the Old Souls into the handle.



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posted at: 12:00am on 18-Jul-2020
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pendulum wall clock

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pendulum wall clockA wall clock I made recently out of quarter-sawn oak. The clock face is made out of veneers of curly ash, mahogany and rose-wood, while the pendulum is made out of curly maple. The oak was dyed with Lockwood antique cherry water based dye, followed by Minwax red mahogany oil based stain. The clock face design is my own, but the clock body design was inspired by some nice clocks I saw for sale at present-time-clocks.com. I purchased the battery powered clock/pendulum mechanism at clock-parts.com



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posted at: 12:00am on 17-Jul-2020
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Zebrawood Bandsaw Box

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Zebrawood Bandsaw BoxI made this bandsaw box to donate to a raffle for our upcoming 51st family reunion (a virtual event this year). Each years raffle helps fund the reunion for the following year. I'm calling this box 'The Lloyd' in honor of the family member who gave me the nice piece of zebrawood when he recently retired his woodworking tools. The front and back are zebrawood, the lamination layers are Baltic birch and Sapele mahogany. The design is my adaptation of a commonly built box with a bit of a base added to it.



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posted at: 12:00am on 17-Jul-2020
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Scale model - Stand Up Paddle board

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Scale model - Stand Up Paddle boardDesigned and lofted. Just as a practice run, maybe one day build one at full size for the lake.



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posted at: 12:00am on 17-Jul-2020
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1930 Ford Coupe street rod

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1930 Ford Coupe street rodThis car is what I call my 300 Win. Mag. The name comes from the manifold which is crafted from a rifle cartridge. The base of the case is also inlaid in the front, just below the nitro tank. I plan to add flames on the side but I am not much of a painter. I will add that photo when I get it done.



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posted at: 12:00am on 16-Jul-2020
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The first and only Portuguese Wood Flag

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The first and only Portuguese Wood FlagOne of my main motivations to build something is building something no one has donne before. And after a quick web search I found out that no one has ever build a wood flag of my country, and there is a reason for that. Unlike the US or Canada where there are lots of designs and some other flags with a relatively simple build, the portuguese flag isnt one of them and that inicially I didnt had any ideia on how to make this. I ended up ask the internet and sure enough I had 4/5 options, I used them all.
First I used transparent vanish mixed with paint to get the big colours. Then I painted the inner blue shields and drilled the 5 points with a dremel, using the same dremel I also carved all the white center shield that I later filled with resin. For the sphere I decided to carve the wood manually (in the orginal flag the sphere is yellow which is basically the same colour as pine, the building material, pallet wood). After that it was just buring the castles with a welding iron and adding some transparent vanish on the top and voilla!!!I will also leave a short 3min video on the entire build, overall I think it looks nice, now I just have to hang it on my wall.””Video on Youtube””:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tRhBZra6Uy0https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tRhBZra6Uy0



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posted at: 12:00am on 15-Jul-2020
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Utility Cabinet

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Utility CabinetI could not take the accumulation of ” stuff ” on my workbench in the barn any longer. So last night I started cutting up all kinds of plywood from my stash in the barn to make this cabinet. It is cobbled up from 3/4” and 5/8” maple, Baltic birch and oak plywood and the top is a cutoff piece of a laminated table top from another project.
It has 4 casters on the bottom so I can move it out of the way if needed. People give me stuff all the time…I can't say no to free stuff..but it has been piling up there for 30 years. I took a before and after shot of the work table and the new cabinet filled with the “stuff”. I have not seen that whole top for a long time. I had to make it sturdy with cross braces screwed and glued under the bottom because it has a lot of weight in it. There are 5 microwave transformers and about 70# of lead ingots in there.The cabinet is finished with shellac just to make it clean up easier.Cheers, Jim



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posted at: 12:00am on 15-Jul-2020
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Toy Cars and Trucks

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Toy Cars and TrucksThis is a 1937 Rolls Royce Phantom III I built for my son Chris.



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posted at: 12:00am on 15-Jul-2020
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Live edge picnic table

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Live edge picnic tableThis is a live edge picnic table I recently finished. The table top and benches are made from a western red cedar tree I had on my tree farm. It was milled at a local sawmill and then flattened on a dual head 52” drum sander. Base is made out of cedar 4×4 put together with mostly lap joints. Finish is 5 coats of General Outdoor Oil. Finally getting some sun out here in the NW to sit out and enjoy it. Been a long stretch of lousy weather.



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posted at: 12:00am on 14-Jul-2020
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Round Kitchen Table (and jigs)

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Round Kitchen Table (and jigs)Early this year, my wife and I decided to move ahead with the kitchen remodel we've been discussing for over a decade. We hired a contractor not long before Covid-19 struck. Concern about the virus delayed the start of the work for over a month, but we finally decided to proceed, and the overall project is nearing completion.As part of the remodel, I built this kitchen table to replace our old one. The tabletop is 52 in diameter, 1 1/4 thick (at the perimeter, 3/4 everywhere else), made of basswood (I know… more about that unusual selection below), finished with Rubio Monocoat Oil Plus 2C (Chocolate) and Universal Maintenance Oil. The base is a tablebases.com metal B36 center-pillar metal X-base. Between the two is a lattice-like support structure that stabilizes the top.The table is nice and stable, but time will tell if our material and finishing choices were solid. I'll try to update this page in a year or so to report how the table holds up.In concept, the tabletop is pretty simple, just a standard glue-up of nine 6 wide boards. In practice, it got a bit more complicated, and I'll cover some construction details below. In particular, I wound up building four different jigs along the way: jointing and tapering jigs for my table saw, and circle cutting and offset bases for my plunge router.Thanks for looking!Selecting the tabletop lumberWe wanted a medium thickness (1 1/4) tabletop, but I doubted I would find any 5/4 lumber at the yard. I thought I'd be able to find some 8/4, but I didn't have a bandsaw for resawing, and I didn't want to plane 3/4 off it (that's a lot of material, and money, to convert into planer shavings). As a result, I designed the top with 3/4 lumber in mind, wrapping planed-down 1/2 thick stubs around at the board ends to simulate thicker planks. SketchUp helped me optimize the cuts to minimize waste.At the lumberyard, we found 3/4 maple and walnut, but my wife is particular about board-to-board color and grain consistency, and we couldn't find enough matching boards. We didn't want oak, cherry, or ash, but we did find a good set of basswood boards. I didn't know that much about it, other than it was soft, light, and relatively inexpensive.It wasn't until we got home and I started researching basswood finishing that I realized that nobody builds furniture with it because of its softness. It seems to be more of a woodcarver's wood. I decided to proceed anyway. Our kids are grown, and we're both careful people, so I thought the tabletop might be durable enough for us. If not, I'll just build another top out of proper hardwood in a year or two.Jointing the boardsThe boards I bought were 7 to 8 wide, and I needed to rip them to a uniform 6 width. As usual, their edges weren't completely straight. Some were slightly curved, and some were waney. I don't own a jointer, and I should have paid the lumberyard to joint the edges, but I didn't.Instead, I built a simple table saw jointing jig. It's basically a 54 auxiliary fence that wraps around the saw's fence. In has a semicircular blade pocket in the center of its left edge, and the edge in front of the blade is inset by about 1/16, or about half the width of the blade. The inset edge acts like a real jointer's infeed table (if you turned the jointer sideways), and the edge behind the blade acts like the outfeed table.Building it was easy. After building a bottomless box that fit snugly around the fence, I centered the box relative to the blade. (A stop inside the box butts up against the back of the fence to preserve that centering.) Then I lowered the blade completely, aligned the left edges of the jig and blade, turned on the saw, and raised the blade to its full height to create the blade pocket. To complete the jig, I removed it and placed it against the fence so half the blade width was exposed, then pushed the jig forward to cut the inset face (the infeed table).To set up the jig for jointing, I placed it back over the fence and slid the fence so the jig's left edge lined up with the outside of the blade's teeth.To joint a board, I just held it firmly against the jig and ran it through several times. Each pass removed a tiny bit from parts of the board's edge. Eventually, the trimmed edge was basically straight. It wasn't straight enough for glue-up, but it was close enough that placing it against the fence and ripping the opposite edge did produce a glue-ready edge (after some cleanup with a sanding block in some cases). Then I placed that straight edge against the fence to rip the board to its final width.It was a tedious process, but it did work. Afterward, I discovered that my jig wasn't perfectly straight. I think the problem was that I used an old scrap pine board I found in our crawl space for the jig, and it wasn't perfectly straight or flat. (Again, due to Covid-19 concerns, I used what I had rather than risking a trip to Home Depot.) Maybe one day I'll build a new jig out of better material when I'm not in a such a big hurry to get back to my real project.Assembling the tabletopAssembling the tabletop was similar to gluing up any other wide panel from multiple boards. The only source of difficulty was the 54 width of the panel. Neither my cauls nor my clamps are long enough for that.Before gluing up the panels, I glued the 1/2 thick wraparound underboards. I thought this approach would produce tighter edge seams, and that was the case.I glued up the nine boards in sets of three to create 18 wide sub-panels, using dowels to align the boards. I used SketchUp to map out the dowel locations, keeping them away from the perimeter cut line. My new Jessem doweling jig made it easy to align the dowel holes.Gluing the first two sub-panels together was routine. My cauls and clamps can work with 36 wide panels.Gluing the third sub-panel to the rest was the tricky part. Because of the stepped board lengths, I could clamp the sides of the assembly, and I could also use my cauls at an angle to maintain flatness. To clamp the center, I used two 2×4s and my bench like a big vise. I clamped one 2×4 to the end of the bench, parallel to the sub-panels. I used the other 2×4, perpendicular to the sub-panels, to apply pressure to the center. I clamped this second 2×4 to the bench to maintain that pressure.Cutting the tabletop circleTo cut out the 52 circle from the assembled panel, I needed a large router circle cutting jig. I didn't feel like spending $50+ on one, so I made my own from a luan scrap. It's just a long, narrow router base with a hole drilled at the pivot point to create a 26 radius. I also added a stiffening board to the jig to prevent flexing.I decided to cut the circle from the bottom to avoid drilling, then filling, a hole in the top surface. Because of the underboards I used to simulate a thick panel, the glued up panel was 1/2 thicker around the edges than in the center. To work around that difference, I screwed a small 1/2 thick block of scrap to the center of the panel's underside. A 1/8 hole in this block's center held the circle jig's axle (which I borrowed from my Jasper 200 circle jig).With the jig set up, cutting the circle was easy. I made multiple passes with my plunge router and Whiteside RU2100 1/4 spiral upcut bit, removing 1/8 of depth each time. I cut the final pass in sections, clamping supports behind and ahead of the router to keep the offcut from falling.I'm really impressed with that Whiteside bit. It produced an extremely clean cut that required very little cleanup before finishing. It's much better than my fluted straight bit.Removing the excess from the underboardsThe underboards were stair-stepped, and the heaviest ones were at the ends of the tabletop (under the shortest boards). To reduce weight, balance the top, and for looks (even though nobody will ever see), I removed most of the underboards, leaving a 2 wide ring around the top's perimeter.To do this, I drilled more pivot holes, 1/2 apart (to match a 1/2 straight bit) in my circle jig. Then I just routed out increasingly smaller circles until I had removed all of the excess. I took multiple 1/8 deep passes for each circle.Rounding over the tabletop's edgesI used a 1/8 round over bit to round the tabletop's top and bottom edges. Routing the top edge was simple because I had a nice flat surface for the router base.Routing the bottom edge was riskier because the router had to balance on the 2 underboard ring. If the router tipped, the bit would gouge the tabletop's edge. To eliminate that risk, I made another jig, an offset router plate with a 1/2 thick standoff on the end. That jig made the job easy, and the tabletop was ready for sanding and finishing.I'll probably never use the standoff again, but the offset base will come in handy for future projects.Building the support structureAfter I completed the tabletop, I made a disturbing discovery. The basswood was so soft that the top drooped under its own weight (across the grain at the top's ends). That didn't bode well for a pedestal base like we wanted.Necessity being the mother of invention, I devised a solutiona lattice-like support structure. I didn't have any hardwood to use for it (and didn't want to go out to buy any due to Covid-19), but I did have some scrap 1/2 birch plywood. I laminated three pieces of it to form each support beam.I wanted to hide the support structure from view, so I tapered the ends of the beams down to 1/2. I had to throw together a temporary taper jig to do that. Then I used half-lap joints to assemble the structure. (I have since built a kerfmaker and learned how to use it. I wish I had it for this project, because my half-laps joints would have been much tighter.)I drilled elongated screw holes in the support beams to allow for wood movement in the top, then used barely tightened pocket hole screws to attach the structure.The result looks like a giant Eggo waffle, but the overall top is rigid and reasonably light. And the support structure is invisible on the completed table unless you sit on the floor.FinishingWe wanted a dark brown finish. In the past, I've used both TransTint dye and Zar stains to color wood and Arm-R-Seal wiping varnish as a topcoat. My wife wasn't crazy about the colors of the dye/stain I had, and I was worried about getting a perfectly smooth finish on the large tabletop surface. Even with wiping varnish, I've had problems with friction streaks on the final coat of past projects. My wife also didn't want a glossy film finish, so I searched for alternatives.During my research, I ran across Rubio Monocoat Oil Plus 2C. It sounded too good to be truean easy-to-apply (no lap marks), environmentally-friendly (no stink), one-coat, durable finish. Plus, it was designed for use on wood floors, so it should be durable enough for a kitchen table. It's biggest drawback was its price, but at least I could by samples for about $11still pricey, but not prohibitively so.We decided to give it a try, and I ordered a sample of the Black color, which is sort of a blackish brown. It was slightly dark and muddy. Next we tried Ice Brown, which was too light and yellow. Finally, we tried Chocolate. It wasn't perfect, but it was the best compromise.As advertised, the oil was easy to apply. I just poured a bit on the surface, spread and buffed it with a white Scotch-Brite pad, and removed the excess with old towels. It colored the wood like any other pigment stain on close-grained wood. Wiping off all the excess removed almost all the color from the densest parts of the wood. I ended up making two applications (it's not accurate to call them coats), removing most, but not all, of the excess.The resulting finish was okay, but a little blah. It was very matte, similar to that of a dried water-based dye that hasn't been top coated. So we decided to give Rubio more of our money and ordered a bottle of their Universal Maintenance Oil. I applied it the same way, and it added some lifea bit of depth and a slight sheento the finish.If I had to do this again, I think I'd try a water-based dye under the Oil Plus 2C Pure color. The dye would penetrate the wood better, and I'd have more control over its color and tone. I suspect that Rubio's Precolor Easy products are just water-based stains, but I haven't actually read that. (In my testing, I did try Oil Plus 2C over TransTint dye, and dye didn't seem to interfere with the oil.)Finding a baseWe wanted a black metal pedestal base for the table, partially for looks, and partially to avoid legs that would interfere with seating. Using Pinterest, Google, and Etsy, we found a number of candidates, but most were very expensive. I didn't want to spend $400+ on a base.I somehow stumbled upon tablebases.com (which seem to target restaurants) and found two good candidates, the XB36 for $125 and the B36 for $145. Both are simple X-style pedestal bases: a big X at the bottom, a sturdy mounting plate, and a big round pipe connecting the two. The XB36 was out of stock, so we ordered the B36.It's a great base. It's really solid (the mounting plate looks like it could support a car) and bolts together easily. I used 1 #10 wood screws to attach the base to the support structure.I wasn't impressed with their packing methods, but everything else about the company was first-rate, including customer support before and after the sale. My first base arrived with some of the powder coating scraped off (because it shipped in the same box as the mounting plate, with only a few layers of foam blanket separating the two), but they sent me a replacement quickly.



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posted at: 12:00am on 14-Jul-2020
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New pew signs

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New pew signsI had my reservations about taking on this project but I didn't let it handicap my effort. Sorry, couldn't resist.New pew signs for church to replace the really tired looking 1950's signs we where using. Pretty straightforward CNC project. Red Oak with golden oak stain to try and closely match what is on the pews. I keep teaching myself the same lesson over and over. When using the rout, seal, paint, sand method you have to make sure the oak is really well sealed before you paint. Some of them I really had to sand down to fresh wood after painting to get the paint that soaked into the pores of the wood. Rustoleum black oil based enamel paint hand applied and then sanded with a random orbit sander to remove any paint that got outside the routed letters.



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posted at: 12:00am on 14-Jul-2020
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redwood table

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redwood table Hey Lumberjocks
Just wanted to post my latest project – a redwood table for my outdoor patio. I'm in California so it's really never that harsh of an environment. I picked up a large live edge redwood slab outside Gonzalez Ca. with a fairly large section missing. A rancher had it stored in the barn for about 10 years. It's an old growth Redwood from a local forest. Luckily I was able to make the complete top out of one piece. Rare find in these parts. The tree is well over 150 years old and was greatly damaged in a forest fire. I kept the burn marks on the live edge. I flattened the slab to 2 inches taking equal amounts off each side. Next step- epoxy fill with Titanium powder dye. Total Boat is my epoxy of choice for this project. The base design was inspired by Matt Downer from Rico Col. I had a local artist, Big Al, cut the sheetmetal anvil shape on the CNC plasma. I sandwiched the two 10 gage sheetmetal pieces over a row of joined redwood 4×4's. I also welded the 1”x 3” tubes for the cross braces for the tabletop and adjustable feet. I was able trim the redwood base leaving a small section exposed on a side view. Note the squarehead bolts, one of my favorite pieces of hardware. I worked with an acid and peroxide process until I achieved the right patina then coated the entire base with clear laquer. I then put a epoxy (Total Boat) clear epoxy on the tabletop. The finished table is 72” in length, 38” width and 32” tall. One of my larger time consuming and multi-processes project to date, but worth the time and effort.
Thanks for checking out the redwood table. Next up -benches.
Greg



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posted at: 12:00am on 13-Jul-2020
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Scandinavian Low Chair

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Scandinavian Low ChairI have never made a chair before this one. I have a new respect for those who make them. All the curves and angles made it more complex than I had expected. What a great learning experience! The next one will be much easier to do. I used quarter sawn and regular red oak for everything except the skinny slats on the curved area which are ambrosia maple from a friend's back yard blowdown. Finished it with English chestnut stain and satin varnish.



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posted at: 12:00am on 13-Jul-2020
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Old growth Douglas Fir burl

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 Old growth Douglas Fir burlThese are some pieces of an old growth burl I found on my tree farm that I had a local small mill cut down. Figure tree to be at least 270 years old. Been drying for 3 years and hope to make it into tables this winter. Highly unusual pattern with bIrdseye and figuring.



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posted at: 12:00am on 12-Jul-2020
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Kitchen counter stool

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Kitchen counter stoolI was working on a set of kitchen counter stools for My son and daughter-in-law. Here is the prototype. As you can see, this stool is made from wine barrel staves. Solid white oak. No swivel on the seat this time



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posted at: 12:00am on 12-Jul-2020
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Tissue box #2

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Tissue box #2I just finished tissue box #2. I wanted to try something that wrapped around the box. It was a bit of a challenge, but not too bad. Fortunately there wasn't a lot of pieces to match up.George



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posted at: 12:00am on 12-Jul-2020
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TALKING MUSHROOMS - Two - Odd One Out!

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TALKING MUSHROOMS - Two - Odd One Out!This past spring I did some pruning of an old birch tree and collected some branches for my carving cache of wood,
The branches ranged in size and I cut a pile pieces cross-wise that were the blanks for my mushroom caps.
Little did I realize the extensive amount of spalting that had occurred so I was indeed surprised with the results,
I went mad with my carving and had 12 mushrooms on tap before you new it.
Base is walnut.
Enjoy!Roman, the Bootman!



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posted at: 12:00am on 11-Jul-2020
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Simple Walnut Hollow Form

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Simple Walnut Hollow FormA simple hollow walnut form. 4” tall x 7” across. Turned and hollowed completely with Easy Wood Tools chisels. Bottom embellishment done with shop made spiralling tool.Finished with beeswax and mineral oil.



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posted at: 12:00am on 11-Jul-2020
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Multi-Wood Dining Table

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Multi-Wood Dining TableThis was a small dining table/desk I made for en Etsy customer. I did a similar one 2-3 years ago, and it was really neat seeing how far I've come since then. The joints are cleaner and stronger, the table is more solid, and the overall look is miles ahead of what the first one was.I used red oak, sapele, walnut, alder, and cherry, with sapele skirt and legs. The finish is my personal favorite: A Tung Oil Friction Finish, where the wood is oiled and then wet-sanded from 400 to 4000 grit. In the days after the initial finish, I continually hit it with a polishing pad to make sure it was as smooth and polished as I could make it, and it really paid off in the shine it has. As an added bonus, the legs are detachable for easy shipping and storage!This was a really nice project. Simple, straightforward, and beautiful. And to top it off, the client loved it and posted a very nice review!



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posted at: 12:00am on 11-Jul-2020
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Krenov style cabinet

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Krenov style cabinetI saw this cabinet on the Krenov school website. It was titled “throughsie” and was designed by Kurt Gross. It always intrigued me how it was put together. I sat down on sketchup one day and tried to reverse engineer it. I attached a pic of my sketchup drawing showing how it is put together. It looks like a very simple construction, but is actually like a puzzle to put together.1. Half blind dovetails on the top and bottom corners.
2. the shelves sit in stopped dados on the carcase sides
3. the sides connect with tenons that pass through the shelf
4. its primarily made out of red oak from a couple of old drawer fronts
5. door is white oak bookmatched
6. drawer sides are figured maple
7. Door handles are maple and made on the router table
8. finished with danish oilI built it with no real purpose except to challenge my hand tool skills. The router plane was very helpful in this project. I plan on taking it to my office and use it to hold my tea cup and some tea bags in the drawers. It isn't big enough for much else.



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posted at: 12:00am on 10-Jul-2020
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Kitchen unit out of 250 pieces of scrap wood.

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Kitchen unit out of 250 pieces of scrap wood.One of my friends challenged me to make a shelving unit for the kitchen. 1 meter high, 40 cm. deep, 60 cm. wide, 4 shelves. The catch: reclaimed wood or off-cuts / leftovers. And here it is, more than 250 parts went into this unit.The making of:



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2nd wine barrel chair

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2nd wine barrel chairThis week I managed to complete my second wine barrel chair this one for my wife.This time I used the lid of the barrel for the seat, being able to flex the lid to a concave surface. I also chose to make the legs curve outwards. The seat sits on a swivel mechanism, with a 3 tilt.As with the first stool, this chair is made with white oak stave, a colored burgundy by the wine.The finish is Varathane Professional 1100, matte sheen, 2 coats.Hope you like it.



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Wood ducks

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Wood ducksI didn't get the wood duck connection till just now. I made this for a local bird rescue group to sell.George



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posted at: 12:00am on 09-Jul-2020
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BALL BEARING MADE OF WOOD

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BALL BEARING MADE OF WOODBALL BEARING made of wood
Three years ago, I bought the wooden balls because the idea of making the wooden ball bearing was in my mind since then. Few days ago, I decided to go ahead all the way alone with my dream idea. I have not seen anyone had done that before. I maybe the first woodturner who took the challenge.I may try again to improve it including making the balls next time. 140 mm diameter.



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posted at: 12:00am on 09-Jul-2020
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3-D Chessboard

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3-D ChessboardI finished another woodworking project, a 3-D chessboard! It was a fun learning experience making it. Do you think you would enjoy playing a game of chess, or checkers for that matter on this 3-D board?Chris



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posted at: 12:00am on 09-Jul-2020
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Honduran mahogany Jenga

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Honduran mahogany JengaHi everybody.
a neighbour asked me to make a Jenga for his daughter, he just wanted the pieces but as my wife always says…...you have to do a little more, so i made the box, the name and the engraving of about half the pieces and they were very happy with the results. he said he did not expect something so nice.
the name and engraving was done in the laser.Thanks for reading and take care and be safe!



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posted at: 12:00am on 08-Jul-2020
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Indoor Flower Planter

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Indoor Flower PlanterIt's nice to be back again, I was without a computer for quite some time and unable to post. My computer went with my son to college, again, and I didn't get a replacement until June. Then someone explained that I could have used my phone. Maybe if I were younger, I'm not that tech savvy by any means, but I am trying to learn how to use that phone too.
I've made another gift planter, this one goes to my doctor at the VA. If you have ever wondered what socialized medicine would look like all you have to do is look at the VA. I am fortunate to have a very good doctor, she is from the Philippines. I made this planter for her as a thank you for taking such good care of me. I'm old and cantankerous and she has to put up with a lot.
The wood is from Africa, a kind of scrap wood named Black something, Ask Boxguy he gave it to me, a scrap piece and said make something with this. So I did, and he told me the name, but I'm Old and dumb and I can't remember. The trim, splines and inlay are Wenge.
It's 5” 3/4” x 5” 3/4” x 5 3/4” The inside is finished with Flex Seal and the outside is finished with Rubio Monocoat.
Thanks for taking a look at my flower planter. Be kind and Stay Safe



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posted at: 12:00am on 08-Jul-2020
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My Sister's Birthday Present

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My Sister's Birthday PresentHey LJ's,Especially the people who taught me a box is more than a box. Klaus Kiefer, Blacky, Andy, Greg the Cajun Art Box maker, and Big Al! Thanks!
This is the second of two I made recently. See previous post! Klaus' posting was inspirational and breought me back!Box is made from Spaulted maple from my spaulting pile. It's finished with Danish oil using tung oil as an ingredient.Using Big Al's hinge making modified a quality piano hinge.The walnut trim and splines are homegrown and milled.
Due to problems in glue up spent a lot of time cutting and adjusting the felt and faux leather lining.The Maple was leftover from practice pieces for my original Butterfly Box!My sister has been supportive, and she reached one of those milestone birthdays so This box became hers.She really liked it!Hope you do as well!



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posted at: 12:00am on 08-Jul-2020
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Pair of Jewelry Boxes

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Pair of Jewelry BoxesPair of Jewelry Boxes created from Wood whisperer design.
The first is from cherry and curly maple, with cocobolo handles.
Second is all claro walnut. However the drawer fronts and side panels are from a claro board that was 100% sap wood – hence the lighter color. Handles from curly maple (leftover from the other box).
On the curly map, I first used a transtint maple dye, followed by a light sanding – that really made the curl pop. Both boxes were finished with 2 coats of osmo polyx (may be my favorite finish to use these days because of ease of application and the wonderful, natural finish it provides) plus a final rubout with a coat of Black Bison paste wax using #0000 steel wool.
Thanks for lookingFYI: Few other shots I took:



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posted at: 12:00am on 07-Jul-2020
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Small Cherry Box with Swarovski Crystal

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Small Cherry Box with Swarovski CrystalI made this simple box just to try out a cover design. The box is approximately 1 3/4 in diameter and 1 3/4 tall. The crystal is a green Swarovski crystal.
I'm not sure why the second image rotated when I posted the image. Anyone have a suggestion on how to fix the rotation.



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posted at: 12:00am on 07-Jul-2020
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Coffee table wedding present

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Coffee table wedding presentI designed and built this as a present for my daughter's wedding. Made out of quartersawn African mahogany with curly maple veneered lower shelf. The marquetry inlay is made out of curly anigre and mahogany. The mitered legs are reinforced with biscuits and decorative curly maple splines. She loved it :-)



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posted at: 12:00am on 07-Jul-2020
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Douglas fir table with breadboard ends and matching bench

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Douglas fir table with breadboard ends and matching benchThis is a table and matching bench made from Douglas Fir. The table has breadboard ends done with pinned mortise and tenon joinery. The table is stained with briar smoke stain from Varathane and sealed with three coats of polyurethane.



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posted at: 12:00am on 06-Jul-2020
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An Arizona theme Mesquite stand for an unusual copper vase.

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An Arizona theme Mesquite stand for an unusual copper vase.5 Jul 2020Working on some small projects this summer of confusion.After finishing the dining rooms' cherry table my wife eyed a center piece. A major hunk of local copper sculpture she calls a vase. Being quite unsteady to stand on it's own i designed an Arizona themed stand. It's Arizona mesquite, copper and turquoise.I took some end pieces that had live edge, cut a mortise and tenon on each. I used my dado blade to cut the tenons, very cool! Bored the mortise with my powermatic mortiser, so nice to have. They joined together like four arms joined. The base was rabbeted a 1/4” and thin piece of baltic birch ply attached. The tenons are not glued, the base holds everyone together. I added a couple of turquoise gems to the gnarled ends. Finished down to 600, used watco oils and finished with several rubbings of Waterlox. Place a few silicone dots on the bottom to keep it from marring the table surface plus it makes it appear to be floating on the table.
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posted at: 12:00am on 06-Jul-2020
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1920's Buick Sedan

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1920's Buick Sedan This is my second wooden model vehicle, a classic Buick Sedan from the 1920's, made from ash, cherry, walnut and oak. The wheels on this was a challenge as they're spoked.The plans are from Dutchy Patterns https://dutchypatterns.com/pattern/buick-sedan/I videoed this for my YouTube channel if you wish to view https://youtu.be/3FPwGq39O1EAny questions please do not hesitate to ask, all comments welcomeRegards Steve



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posted at: 12:00am on 06-Jul-2020
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Hand Tool Cart with Scary Sharp sharpening station

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Hand Tool Cart with Scary Sharp sharpening stationI never have enough horizontal open space in my shop. Tools, wood, glue, screws, notebooks, etc.. cover all open surfaces (it seems) when working on a project. This project was built to house hand tools (chisels, marking tools, fret saw, handsaws, mallets, sharpening equipment). As part of the design, I wanted it to also provide some additional horizontal workspace and be mobile. Part of the design includes a top that is at the same height as my workbench so if it is not in use, it is an extension of the workbench. The top slides over to allow access to granite tool plate used for sharpening chisels/plane blades. When not in use, the cover protects the paper from collecting saw dust which would have to be cleaned prior to use. There are multiple drawers. These use wood slides just to limit cost. The doors and drawer sides are beech. The cart is birch ply. The top is baltic birch. Finish is wipe on poly. The rollers on this cart can be adjusted to engage a leveling pad if you want to make sure it doesn't move during use. They are a bit of overkill for this cabinet since it doesn't weigh that much but these would be excellent for heavier equipment such as a lathe.



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posted at: 12:00am on 05-Jul-2020
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Vertical Plane till

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Vertical Plane tillStarted collecting and restoring Stanley Hand Planes. Each of these planes is a user, however this collection started inhabiting a lot of real estatate on my table saw side table, and had to be moved each time I wanted to use the saw. I wanted a vertical till so it would not take up quite so much room. Additionally, I am hoping that I can protect the planes from humidity somewhat by housing in a cabinet with doors. The cabinet sides are made of Cherry, the back is made of 3/4 Cherry Ply. This was important because it is holding all the weight of the planes and cabinet. The doors are a combination of Cherry and wormy maple. I was pretty happy with the resulting contrast. The raised panels were all cut on the table saw. The cleats for the till were cut on the band saw and finish shaping on the spindle sander. Wipe on poly for the finish.There is something really zen about hand tools, not giving up the plugged in tools for sure, but if I can use a plane, chisel or hand saw, it is rewarding and often faster.



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posted at: 12:00am on 05-Jul-2020
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Custom Knife and Scales

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Custom Knife and ScalesA custom knife I call the Gunslinger, I casted the knife scales from maple burl with aluminum honeycomb and epoxy tinted with mica pigment. Specifications in picture. Plus I got a nice fat pen blank out of the casting .



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posted at: 12:00am on 05-Jul-2020
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Dump Truck - Maple and Walnut

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Dump Truck - Maple and WalnutMade all the parts except the lights and axles.



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posted at: 12:00am on 04-Jul-2020
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Modern Sideboard with Aluminum Accents

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Modern Sideboard with Aluminum AccentsMy wife and I designed, and I built, this sideboard for our kitchen, which is in the final stages of a remodel. We won't use it to hold dishes or serve food. Instead, we'll store cookbooks in the main cavity, office supplies in the drawers, receipts, menus, and working papers in desk trays in the open cubby, and odd and ends wherever they will fit.Aside from the storage requirements, my wife wanted the visible edges on the front of the sideboard to be thin to give it a more refined, less chunky appearance.The sideboard will be located along a short wall near the opening to our family room, so it needed to be as narrow as possible while remaining practical. Overall, it's 42 wide, 32 high (not including the 6 legs), and 13 1/2 deep.For the finish, we opted for paint even though I really, really dislike painting. (I don't have a sprayer, and I always struggle to achieve a smooth, even finish.) We tested a few paint types and settled on General Finishes Milk Paint in Queenstown Gray. Internet sources vary on whether a topcoat is needed. I didn't topcoat it, so I hope it's durable. We also wanted some interesting accents and decided on inlaid aluminum strips, brushed nickel finger pulls, metal legs, and shadow lines between the sides and top/bottom.Because of the painted finish, I decided to build the sideboard entirely from Baltic birch plywood. I thought its void-free composition would let me paint the exposed edges without resorting to edge banding.My wife is really happy with the sideboard, and it fits well with the modern design of our new kitchen.For anyone who is interested, I'll describe some construction details and challenges below. Thanks for looking!Building the CaseI don't build many large cabinets, and I was worried that 1/2” plywood would flex or sag over time. I opted for 1/2” plywood for the sides, but 3/4” for the top, bottom, and vertical dividers.To make the top and bottom look like they were made of 1/2” plywood, I cut rabbets on the front edges (above the drawers and below the doors).I also cut rabbets and dados for joints. That let me easily test-fit the case parts and kept everything aligned during glue-up.I'll talk about this more later, but I painted the interior surfaces before assembly.Because the sides were so thin, I didn't cut dados for the cubby shelf and under-drawer dust panel. I used dowels instead. My new Jessem doweling jig made that job easy. (I don't know if it's possible to love a tool, but this jig makes me think it's possible.)I also used the Jessem jig to drill the shelf pin holes.To strengthen the side/top joints, I added small metal angle brackets. They're hidden by the drawers.I used dowels through the bottom into the sides to reinforce those joints.I opted for a 1/2” back to further strengthen the case. I had to piece it together in sections because of how I had the plywood cut for shipping (and to omit the dado from the back of the cubby).Cutting Dados for the Aluminum Accent StripsI recently built a kerfmaker based on the design from YouTube creator I Simply Built This (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uhPvanE9fnc). I have seen several designs, and his is my favorite.This project gave me my first opportunity to use it on a real project. It worked very well. I used it with my table saw to cut all of the dados and rabbets for this project, including the dados for the aluminum inlay on the drawers and door fronts.To use it, I lined up the cut closest to my sled's stop, used the kerfmaker with the tongue extended to set the stop block's position, and made the cut.Then, without moving the stop block, I rotated and moved the kerfmaker so its set screw touched the stop block, moved the work piece to contact the kerfmaker, and made the second cut.Then I just made repeated cuts to remove the remaining material.The only thing that would have made this job easier was a flat top grind saw blade. It took some sanding/scraping to flatten the grooves left by my saw blade.Working with AluminumThe accent strips are 3/8” wide, 1/4” thick 6061 aluminum bar stock from McMaster-Carr.The worst thing about working with it is cleaning it. I used a combination of 150-grit sandpaper and Scotch-Brite pads. It makes quite a mess (very fine dust particles), and I've learned to cover my workbench when cleaning metal to avoid powder stains.Otherwise, it's not too different from wood. I used my table saw to cut the pieces to size, and I used sandpaper to round over the outside ends.Painting (Prefinishing)As I mentioned in the introduction, I don't like painting. I'm hopeless with a brush and only slightly less so with a mini foam roller. I didn't relish the idea of painting the inside of the sideboard after construction, so I decided to paint all of the interior surfaces first.I tested both foam and short nap (1/4”) rollers and got slightly better results from the latter. The main difference was that the short nap roller didn't show pressure/friction marks as easily as the foam roller.This photo is more of a reminder for me if I forget what to use in future projects. I found it at Lowe's.Before priming, I taped off all of the dados and rabbets that would later receive glue. That was very tedious.I applied two coats of Zinsser 1-2-3 primer. It was easy to apply, dried quickly, and sanded well. I don't know if BIN (shellac based) would have been better or not.I used General Finishes Milk Paint (Queenstown Gray) for the finish. I really like this paint. If it ends up being as durable as I hope, it will be my go-to for all future painted projects. It's fairly thick, but it's easy to apply with a roller. (I think those of you who are good with a brush would also like it.) It doesn't stink, and it dries quickly. I applied three coats, waiting two hours and sanding lightly between coats.I'm not sure how I feel about pre-painting. The taping took a long time, and I needed every horizontal surface I had to place the drying panels. In a few places, my tape encroached a bit too far into the cabinet interior, leaving unpainted slivers at inside corners that I had to touch up later. I also had to take a lot of extra care during and after assembling the case to avoid scratching or marring the paint.On the other hand, if I had tried to paint everything after assembly, I'm sure I would have had just as many problems, particularly with a roller.One last note. Earlier, I mentioned choosing Baltic birch plywood so I didn't have to band the edges. That did turn out to be the case. So far, I'm not seeing any plies telegraphing through the paint on the exposed edges.I did rub Zar wood patch over the edges to fill the pores. It came in a tube and squeezed out like very thick toothpaste. I just smeared it on with my finger and sanded it when it dried. It was similar to using joint compound, but it was slightly less messy during sanding.Mounting the HingesI used Blum Euro hinges for the doors. I used my drill press to drill the cup holes and a temporary jig to drill the mounting bracket holes in the sides.The thin sides created a minor headache. The screws that came with the hinges are 5/8” long and were slightly too long for the thin sides. Instead of trying to find and order 1/2” screws, I used my Dremel to cut off the tips.I drilled countersunk holes in a piece of 1/2” scrap and drove the screws. Then it was easy to cut the screws to length.Building the DrawersIn the past, I've used pocket screws to assembly my drawer boxes. For this project, I used my doweling jig. It was just as quick and easy, and it looks better.Mounting the Finger PullsThe finger pulls look nice, but they're a bit of work to mount because they require mortises on both the edge and back of the drawer face or door.The edge mortises are just very shallow dados, so I used my table saw and kerfmaker to cut them. I couldn't do that for the back mortises, so I made temporary jigs and used my router and pattern bit. After that, I cleaned up the mortise corners with a chisel.The pulls are mounted on the top inner edge of the doors, so I butted the doors together and cut the mortises for both at the same time.The drawer pulls are mounted in the centers of the top edges of the drawer fronts, so I had to cut them separately, but I used a similar jig.When I installed the door pulls after painting, I wished that I had cut them slightly wider than necessary. Because of the thickness of the paint or slightly out-of-center screw holes, the pulls protruded slightly from the door edges and contacted each other. I had to slightly widen the back mortises to eliminate that contact.Securing the Adjustable ShelvesThe main cavity is divided in half vertically, and there's an adjustable shelf in each half. I used dowels as hinge pins, and I didn't want the shelves to slide. To ensure that, I routed short, 5/16” wide slots in the shelf bottoms. When the shelves are in place, those slots wrap around the dowels to secure the shelves. The slots will also work with metal shelf pins if I rotate them slightly.Mounting the Metal LegsThe legs we selected (Peter Meier 556 in brushed steel) have five-hole mounting plates. To simplify drilling the screw holes, I built a jig. I drilled holes through the jig with my drill press to make sure they were perfectly perpendicular so I could flip the jig upside down as needed.



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posted at: 12:00am on 04-Jul-2020
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Storage Shed

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Storage ShedNot fine wood working, only basic construction in this project. :-)Like everyone in world, needed more storage space. If you read my blog, already know was forced to downsize and moved into this rental home late last year. Decided to build a portable 6×12 shed that could be moved easily when time comes. Making it portable added requirement for solid base, and keeping things light but strong.
Shed size is small enough that no permits were required. Only caveat was HOA requirement to color match house/trim.Base is 14ga 2×3 steel frame welded. Size is 2” smaller than inside of a U-haul 6×12 trailer. Welded a couple pulling eyes on front end to enable dragging it out of side yard.

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After welding, painted with frame with enamel to increase longevity.

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Glued and screwed down 3/4” pressure treat plywood to complete base. Picture at top shows base leveled on some patio stones in final installation location.Used simple 2×4 framing for walls, glued and screwed into metal base frame. Walls were glued and nailed with T1 siding, and radiant foil barrier OSB for roof. Roof uses tabbed shingles on 3 pitch slant roof. Since AZ doesn't have freezing rain and ice dam issues, didn't need to use roll roofing common despite the low pitch.A weight saving feature on the shed is trim wood. Used 1/4 thick cedar siding, that was ripped to standard width. This kept the shed to my portable size constraints, and reduce the overall weight.Construction was completed with base pushed away from house wall by 4ft (pictured at top), and when completed was able to use 2×6 as lever bar to slide it over into final position. Shed feels like similar weight as pushing my 900lb 20” planer around shop? LOLBefore I closed up interior walls with fire rated OSB, wired the shed with small sub-panel. It is fed by a 50A RV circuit using extension cord and locking plugs to solve the lack of power issues in side yard. Picture of power panel is at the top as well.In the future, if this shed were used next to the garage, the power panel would let me use the shed as compressor and dust collector out building. Shed has 2 GFCI circuits with inside/outside receptacles, an inside overhead light, outdoor security light, plus a 30A 240v receptacle for my welder. There is also enough power to run a mini-split and PC/TV for when SWMBO kicks me out of house and I have to live in there. Wife calls it my 'he shed' as all it needs is to have trailer bolted underneath, and it's a tiny house. :-)Have built several sheds in past. Normally they take 2-4 weeks? This build was agonizingly slow to finish, built over ~4 months total. Primary issue was only working a couple days a week. It was started at end January, right before Covid-19 shelter orders were given. Then my son and wife descended upon the home 24/7 and my quiet retirement life become complicated. One limit was when I could make construction noise outside the new home office(s). My ongoing health challenges also limited overall shop time.The inside of shed was painted white, but I forgot to take photo before I moved stuff into shed.
Learned recently that thanks to the 4ft led fixture inside, and led spot lights on front of shed; I can see well enough to work in side yard after dark. So adding the power panel provided flexibility I had not planned. :-)Thanks for reading and Have a Great Day!Long live the real Captain Klutz (Mad Magazine)!



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posted at: 12:00am on 04-Jul-2020
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Mini Trebuchet

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Mini TrebuchetQuarantine time also means making fun things with your kids. We based it on this http://woodarchivist.com/3769-toy-trebuchet-plans/ but modified it to be easier for the kids to make. They've had fun launching rocks down the driveway.



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posted at: 12:00am on 03-Jul-2020
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Family Tree Carving With Solder Inlay

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Family Tree Carving With Solder InlayQuarantine time means free time to try new techniques. I wanted to try another carving project and was inspired by one I saw of a tree inlayed with silver. I inlayed mine with solder wire and filed then sanded it smooth. This was also my first attempt at raised letter carving. It was a piece of scrap wood and serves no functional purpose but it was a fun project to attempt.



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posted at: 12:00am on 03-Jul-2020
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Wild Olive wood and Wormy chestnut

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Wild Olive wood and Wormy chestnutI knew I was running out of Olive wood and I decided a few weeks ago that I wanted a matching set of desk lamps. This is one of the very few times that I plan a specific outcome regarding my RM work and I set out to make them as close as possible. When I do something like this I have to make everything at the same time just to be as exact as can be especially with the RM.
The end result is 2 lamps that are sitting on a 4 1/4” square base with a 7” riser to a 1 3/4” platform for the 5” harp to bolt to. I used 5 watt LED bulbs in both of them because that particular bulb gives off an enourmous amount light for 5 watts and they don't use too much electric.
I should have mentioned that the cat is just a regular size critter, the lamps are much smaller than I normally make.
The Shade is 6” high with an 8” wide mouth and resin, walnut and wild olive wood are the only ingredients. the base, riser and platform are wormy chestnut which is just as prescious as the olive wood and nearly as hard to come by. I'll probably own these forever because I won't separate them, they're way too cute as a pair.following are a few pictures of the wormy chestnut in all it's glory.I couldn't leave without showing my drying table – it's getting pretty crowdedThanks for looking and as always I welcome any and all comments and criticisms



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posted at: 12:00am on 03-Jul-2020
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Trinity Vase

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Trinity VaseMade these three vases for my pastors. Made of Wenge, bloodwood, maple, holly, tiger maple, walnut. 8”tall x 8.5” dia.



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posted at: 12:00am on 02-Jul-2020
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Wood Room addition to Shop

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Wood Room addition to ShopJust completed Wood Room addition to Shop (still need to paint it), Inside pics to follow once racks are hung.1st picture – Outside view of the Wood Room addition to shop….16' x 10' used to store wood inside the shop to keep it dry and give additional workspace in the shop. Completed June 21, 2020.2nd picture – This is what I call the Wood Window that allows me to put boards or sheets of plywood into the Wood Room without having to go through the shop. Window is 5' wide x 18” tall3rd picture – Wood Window open showing the rollers I installed to make it easier to put boards and sheet goods into the Wood Room



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posted at: 12:00am on 02-Jul-2020
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Scan it, see it, grab it... Shop Helpers

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Scan it, see it, grab it... Shop HelpersThe never ending search to make a fixed space larger, or at least more efficient. Alternating between fine(er) woodworking and shop projects. The mobile clamp rack is from April Wilkerson which she got from Infinity Tools design.



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posted at: 12:00am on 02-Jul-2020
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Wine Barrel Stool

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Wine Barrel StoolSo, here's what's been happening in my shop this week…After cruising the internet for “wine barrel furniture”, I came to the conclusion that I could do that!So I ordered two large wine barrels from a local guy, who delivered them to my door. HEAVY! And made of white oak! Not that expensive, since I can get two of these chairs out of one barrel.A week later I was able to start working on the project. I decided to make a tall stool, bar height, with arms and a swivel action.The staves that came out of the barrel were amazing such high quality, and deep, deep burgundy red. The color had penetrated 1/8 into the wood. The wood was intact, with no signs of deterioration.So I drew up a plan and went to work. And here is the result my first wine barrel chair.The first image shows the chair dry-assembled, before finishing. The foot rail is one of the barrel hoops, cut to size, and finished with automotive hi-temp paint, that was cured in the kitchen stove. I should have smiled for the camera :-)The varigation of color as a result of bevelling and sanding edges is remarkably beautiful.Thanks to all the other wood workers who posted image of their builds so that I could see how they are made. I stand on their shoulders.



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posted at: 12:00am on 01-Jul-2020
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Four More Marking Gauges

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Four More Marking GaugesThese four making gauges were made from brass ones that I purchased. I turned down the brass to my original dimensions and then turned the wood cover from exotic woods to dress them up. I was told by a friend that African black wood is ” chiippy”...that it is brittle and chips break off. I did not find that to be the case with it but I thought I would look up the Janka hardness numbers on all of these for comparison.
The first one is Canary wood from Brazil ( Janka 1520) Next is Cocobola from Mexico (Janka2960). Next is Jarrah from W Australia (Janka1400) and last is African Blackwood from S Africa ( Janka 3760).
For comparison Aspen is Janka 380.They are finished with EEE and ShellawaxCheers, JimHere is what I turn them down to:



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posted at: 12:00am on 01-Jul-2020
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French Polished Cypress Stump Table

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French Polished Cypress Stump TableIn May 2019 I had a pair of Cypress trees cut down. One of them had an impressive flair at the base that I asked the tree service to preserve for me. It had to become a table. It took me a while to decide on what kind of table. It took some work with a chainsaw, router sled, scrub plane and a slick to get it into shape.For coloring I fumed it with ammonia than then used dark tung oil to give it more color and protection. I was having trouble getting the finish to build completely on the end grain (yes pure tung oil can build a sheen) Some specific sections of the end grain just remained thirsty so I eventually switched over to a French polish with shellac to complete the finish on the shelves. Topped off that with a couple of treatments with Odie's Oil as the source of wax and a bit of water protection.Lots more build photos and step by steps on source: Cypress Console Table



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posted at: 12:00am on 01-Jul-2020
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