The Woodshop Shed

adventures in woodworking and home maintenance, from my shop in an oversized backyard shed

June 2019
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My Tilt-Top Tool Stand

Furnished content.
(from Lumberjocks.com)


My Tilt-Top Tool StandThe stand is made from construction lumber. The sides are made from two 2×4 legs connected by 2×6 stretchers. The stretchers are attached with two 1/2×2 1/2 -in. dowels and glue at each joint. The front and back stretchers connect the sides together at the bottom. Two 1/4×4-in. hex bolts terminating into two cross dowels inserted into 15/16-in. holes in the stretchers make a secure connection for the stretchers at each corner. The eight cross dowels are made from 1 1/2-in. lengths of 3/4-in electrician's EMT. A 5/16 hole is drilled into one side of each and a 1/4-20 nut is used to secure the hex bolt to the cross dowel. The bottom panel is cut from a piece of 1/2-in. plywood and set in a 3/8-in. deep dado.The table top is constructed from two pieces of 3/4-in. plywood with two pieces of 1/2-in. MDF. The MDF pieces are separated at the center by 5/8-in. to construct a channel for a 5/8-11 threaded rod. A 5/8-in wide x 1/16-in. dado was cut in the plywood so the channel after assembly would be 5/8-in. square. I used MDF because it was in my scrap bin. 1/2-in. plywood would also work but the dado would need to be a little deeper. I used spray-on contact adhesive to stick the pieces together. To aid in alignment of the parts after the adhesive had been applied, I drilled a few 3/8-in. perpendicular holes through the parts and inserted 3/8-in. dowels. I considered assembly with the contact adhesive to be faster than using glue, weights and clamps.The corner hardware is made from 1/4 by 4-in. eye bolts. Carriage bolts 1/4×2 1/2-in. with lock nuts secure the eyebolts in 9/32-in. slots center of the top. 1/2 OD x 1/4 ID x 1/4-in. thick bushings fill up the space between the loop of the eyebolt and the 1/4-in. carriage bolts. The slots in the top were cut on my table saw using a jig that I made to cut the corner spline slot for picture frames. A 1/4-in. Forstner bit was used to “gouge out” room for the eye end of the bolts.The 9/32-in. slots in the top of the legs to receive the corner hardware were cut on the table saw using a dado blade. A 1/2×2 1/2-in. dowel pin was glued in a 1/2-in. hole between the slots and the top of each leg to prevent breakage.The 5/8-in. threaded rod is held in the top at each side by a flat washer, a lock washer and a 5/8-11 nut. Another flat washer acts as shim between the nut and the bearing block. The bearing block is made from glued-up pieces of Baltic birch plywood. I found two brass 1/2-in. NPT nipples in the plumbing department of the home center that would almost fit over the 5/8-in. threaded rod. After cutting the rod to length, a flat file was used to remove a few thousands of the thread so that the bearings would fit over the rod. The bearings were pressed into 3/4-in. holes in the bearing blocks and the blocks were mounted to the top stretchers using 1/4-in. hex bolts.The heavy steel brackets to support the casters are made by splitting with a metal-cutting bandsaw two brackets obtained from the deck and patio builder's section of a home store. The brackets attach to the legs with -in. carriage bolts. The castors attach to the brackets with two 5/16 hex head bolts and to the end grain of the legs with two hex head 5/16 lag screws.The table was sized to be just large enough for the planner. But if I were building it again, I would make the legs a little shorter because for me at 5'-8, the sander work surface seems a little high (47 -in.). I clamped on a stick to simulate a new position for the lower stretchers if the legs were shortened. My little test showed that I could reduce the distance between the top and the lower stretchers by up to 3 -in.Dimensions:
Table top 27 x 25 x 2-in.
Base: 30 x 25×31-in. (without casters)
Bearing blocks: 5×2 x 1/1/2-in. wide
Top of leg to upper stretcher: 2 -in.
Bottom of leg to bottom of lower stretcher: 2 -in.Metal Parts Used (except as noted, all parts should be available in hardware store or home center):
1 ea. 5/8-11×36-in. threaded steel rod, 2 nuts, 2 lock washers, 4 flat washers
4 ea. 1/4×4-in. eye bolt with 1/2-in opening in eye
4 ea. 1 1/2-in. plastic knobs with 1/4-20 threaded insert, 4 flat washers to put under knobs
4 ea. 1/4×2 1/2-in. carriage bolts with lock nuts and flat washers
4 ea. 1/2 OD x 1/4 ID x 1/4-in. steel spacer (Mcmaster.com 92415A862)
4 ea. 1/4×3-in. lag bolts to mount bearing blocks
2 ea. brass nipple, 1/2-in. NPT, 1 1/2-in.
8 ea. 1/4×4-in. hex bolts with flat washers and nuts for lower stretchers
12-in. 3/4-in. dia. electricians EMT cut into 8, 1 1/2-in. lengths (normally comes in 10 -ft. lengths)
4 ea. castors, 2 3/4-in. wheels seem okFor caster mounting:
2 ea. Simpson Strong Tie deck and patio connector, ML267
8 1/4×2-in. carriage bolts with nuts
8 5/16×1-in. hex bolts with lock nuts
8 ea. 5/16×3-in. lag boltsBolts, nuts and washers to mount your tools.



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Shelf

Furnished content.
(from Lumberjocks.com)


ShelfShelf made possibly for cameras. The wood used is macadamia nut which I got from Hawaii and curly maple which I used aniline dye to really make the figure pronounced. Macadamia nut has the grain of lacewood and is really quite beautiful and unlike any other wood. The slab I got was a funky shape but while building my lounge chair I used the bending form to make the bottom part of the shelf and cut that to shape on the macadamia nut so it follows the curve while being bent. It looks really cool.



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Wall Paneling

Furnished content.
(from Lumberjocks.com)


Wall PanelingHere is a quick slideshow of a job I did last year.
View on YouTube



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