The Woodshop Shed

adventures in woodworking and home maintenance, from my shop in an oversized backyard shed

May 2019
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Cheap Moxon Vise Build

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(from Lumberjocks.com)


Cheap Moxon Vise BuildFigured I need all the help I can get to improve my results when it comes to dovetails. As usually discussed the vise allows the work piece in a more comfortable height for sawing and chisel work. I didn't see a need for a large vise as most of the time will be working on smaller projects and allowed me to use up some off cuts.The main vise body is constructed from a birch butcher block scrap. Front jaw is constructed of hard maple and vise screws are dumbbell handles. Bought the Gold's gym handle and cut the rubber grip off (easy to slice then peel away) to get a 14 inch bar. Cut the bar in half then ground the threads flat and drilled a hole to secure to vend and drilled a 1/4 inch hole. A couple bronze flange bushings and 1/4 inch lag bolts rounded out the build. Definitely not fancy but so far have been pleased with the added height.Have about 9 inches between screws and about 2 inches opening to hold stock. Figure that easily covers most drawers and boxes I will build. May add some dog holes later for kicks.



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posted at: 12:01am on 21-May-2019
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Push sticks for days

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(from Lumberjocks.com)


Push sticks for daysTime for a new push stick. Time to build a jig. I wanted to keep a couple of push sticks handy to avoid using the same one for all cuts and destroying the bottom and having to throw it away. I used 1.5” x 1.5” for the handle and 1/2” for the body. I cut a 7” piece and cut 1/2” slots with the dado blade. The handle is at 60 degrees to the body. I cut a slot in the body with the dado to fit onto the handle. A little glue and trim the bottom 1/2” from the body. Now I can make a bunch at a time and always have a few at hand.



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posted at: 12:01am on 21-May-2019
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Ceiling Fan Frame

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(from Lumberjocks.com)


Ceiling Fan FrameWhen we bought the home we now live in a year ago it had a florescent light in the middle of the kitchen. It was a 2' X 2' frame with double bulbs. Some times they would come on and some times they wouldn't. My wife also wanted a ceiling fan.Woodworker to the action. A year later after thinking about what I could do, I took down the existing light.Wow they had installed the light before they painted the ceiling so If I wanted to paint the bare spot I would get to paint 3 rooms and a hall so that the paint would match. Choice #1Choice #2 – make a box 2' X 2' and install the fan inside it.I opted for #2.I bought a 2'X4' piece of maple 1/4” plywood and I looked around my veneer to see what I had.Momentary Pause here—Since I moved to Virginia from Delaware and my veneer and wood was moved over 6 months and was stacked in different piles and spaces. It was put at the nearest spot that was empty. I then threw some 2X4 and plywood on the rafters to stash the veneers. They again were placed where they would fit. So to say “I looked around to see what I had!” really meant that the first place I looked was where the “Trojan Horse Platform Ladder” happened to be sitting (See My Workshop: Note this was the old one not the new one, But the Trojan Horse was moved and Rebuilt) and on the rafter above it was a few sheets of Russian Karelian Birch wood veneer. I needed sheets that would be at least 24” long and wide enough to cover 24”. I found 3 sheets that were 8 1/4” and 25” long so when I cleaned up the edges I was just able to get the 24” in width.Unfortunately the sheets were not book matched. I had bought this veneer from someone who had selected his pieces and I got the left overs. They were close enough in matching that I slip matched them instead of book matching them. You also shouldn't book match an odd number of sheets Unless it is really necessary. But in my case there were some missing sheets of veneer between what I had so so the match wouldn't have even been close.I found my veneer bag and pump buried in different places after the move. I hooked it together and the pump would not pull any vacuum. So I thought the bag might have gotten punctured in the move. So a few days to find my air compressor and blow up my bag with a soap spray. No leaks found. But it was still not pulling vacuum. It would pull vacuum if I put my finger over the end of the hose. I then found that the attachment to the bag had broken it seal and there was no seal. So I went to joewoodworker.com to get some new attachment pieces.They were installed but still no vacuum being pulled. I took apart the piping to my apparatus and I found that the check valve was full of saw dust that it had sucked from the bag over the years.. I reassembled all the parts to put the filter in front of all other parts of the system. I had been filtering the air before it went to the pump but not before it went to any other parts of the system. That's now been fixed and I have vacuum.I glued the veneer on the plywood and then I took it to a woodworkers meeting to show and tell. Then I left it in my van overnight and over day. When I took it out the plywood was warped. ”””” YOU ARE NEVER SUPPOSED TO VENEER ONLY ONE SIDE OF PLYWOOD!””” So I put the sheet on a flat surface, put lots of weight on it and let it stabilize for a few days. Then I glued some backer veneer on the other side. It became pretty flat. I then took the other 2'' X 2” piece and glued it on the back. So now my panel was 1/2” thick instead of 1/4” thick. And flat as could be.I took some 1” thick Sapele and made the frame cutting a 1/2 X 1/2” rabbit on the bottom inside edge so that I could glue the panel into the frame.My concern now became how am I going to mount this frame unto the ceiling. There was only one joist and that was where the electric box had been attached to the light I removed. I finally decided to put some 1-1/2” Brass screws close to the 4 corners. You can almost see them in the closest 2 corners about 4” from the sides. I used brass screws and brass finish washers. They were screwed into plastic wall hangers rated for 50 lbs each. Then I screwed the fan hanger attachment with 2” screws into the joist. The other end of the fan attachment is screwed into my 1/2” thick panel. So nothing is attached to the electrical box holding up this assortment of parts.So this frame is about 1/2” bigger than the unpainted ceiling. Blessing #1. The fan works and the light works with the remote control. Blessing #2. My wife is happy. Blessing #3. She even let me cook steaks for supper as a reward.So now I'm thinking In order to match the fan to the ceiling box I might veneer the fan blades with some more of that unmatched veneer. I am going the veneer the space above the Microwave/exhaust to cover up the exhaust pipe. But that will be another posting.



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posted at: 12:00am on 20-May-2019
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Santa on the Moon

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(from Lumberjocks.com)


Santa on the MoonThis is Santa on the Moon. He was busy hanging stars in the sky, sat down on the moon to rest and fell asleep! Santa is carved from basswood and is about 7 inches tall.Claude



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posted at: 12:00am on 20-May-2019
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Gamble House Side Chairs

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(from Lumberjocks.com)


Gamble House Side ChairsA set of 15 dining side chairs in Sapele and ebony with nickel silver pins. These chairs are based on a Greene & Greene design for the Gamble House in Pasadena, as adapted by Darrell Peart and Bob Lang. The leather slip seats were covered by a local upholsterer, Jet Upholstery, who did an excellent job capturing the original Greene & Greene look. This set of chairs took me a little over a year to build. The finish is water borne dye stain topped with water borne lacquer.Here are the project totals, for those that are interested.Board feet of Sapele used: 315
4' x 8' sheets of 3/4” baltic birch plywood: 2
Number of chair parts fabricated: 285
Number of mortises: 720
Number of floating tenons: 360
Number of square ebony plugs: 405
Number of ebony splines: 120
Quarts of finish used: 10
Hours to complete: 596You can see all of the details of the build in my blog posts.Thanks for looking!



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posted at: 12:00am on 20-May-2019
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Lathe and Buffer Stand

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(from Lumberjocks.com)


Lathe and Buffer StandI sold my 15×38 Craftsman lathe ( with the shelves under it) last weekend so I lost the machine I did my buffing on and also the storage for so many of the accessories for my Nova lathe. I decided to make a storage cabinet for all that stuff plus have a place to mount my HF mini lathe on and set it up for pens. I had this Grizzly knife buffer in my way on my regular workbench so I mounted it on the back of the stand for buffing. I have an adapter on it to accept my Beall buffing system.The cabinet is 19” x 31” x 36” high. It is made from plywood I had laying around and a laminate covered Steelcase top . I just had to buy the hinges and the casters. I put a shot of the caster that I bought on E bay.They are 3” and lock the wheel and the swivel with the one lever.I put a long cord on it and mounted 2 duplex outlets so I can plug in both machines and 2 other things if needed.
I add 3 cord spools on it to keep the cords managed and out of the way. The doors have 4 – 10mm magnets mounted in them for closure. It is finished with gray latex enamel!Cheers, Jim



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posted at: 12:01am on 19-May-2019
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End Grain Cutting Boards

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(from Lumberjocks.com)


End Grain Cutting BoardsI recently completed by first ever cutting boards. These were both made as gifts for two different weddings. They were both made with a combination of walnut, cherry, and hard maple. As these were my first cutting boards, I need some help coming up with design ideas. So, I experimented with several different designs using CBdesigner before settling on these.I used a combination of power and hand tools to complete these. As I don't have access to a planer, the most time consuming parts were flattening the boards after the first and second glue up. After the first glue up, I did all the flattening with a smoothing plane. Thankfully, I was able to use the end mill at my office to flatten the end grain after the second glue up. On the first board, I used a 3/4” straight bit which still took a really long time. When it was time to make the second board, I bit the bullet and ordered a 2” Whiteside spoilboard bit which made things go much much quicker. After a lot of sanding, I finished these with mineral oil applied daily for the first week. Final thickness ended up being ~1.5” with overall rough dimensions of 11” x 14”.These were a lot of fun to make, and hopefully they'll get a lot of use from the new families who received them. I got a lot of inspiration from all the other LJ cutting boards, so thank you!



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posted at: 12:01am on 19-May-2019
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Segmented Patterned Bowl

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(from Lumberjocks.com)


Segmented Patterned BowlSegmented pattern Kauri top and base with Rimu, Kahikatea, Cedar and Fijian Kauri segments 140 mm in diameter x 100 mm high.Comments welcome.



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posted at: 12:01am on 19-May-2019
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Baby's swing

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Baby's swingThere was no tree on our 2 acre property that would be acceptable for my infant sons swing. So as a determined mother this is what I came up with after HOURS of grueling research on Google. Once I started, it took about 3 days, and that's in between working as a construction labour, dirty diapers and spent ABSOLUTELY NO MONEY!!! It was all scrap wood laying around the property for years and a hidden box of framing screws.



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posted at: 12:06am on 18-May-2019
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Scrap - Wood Storage Cart

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Scrap - Wood Storage CartAs most woodworkers realize how impossible it is to keep your lumber supplies organized. Over the past 5 years I have created so many projects in my attempt to solve this dilemma and to be honest some of them worked for a while and others failed miserably.
At the present moment I have 3 units that I currently fit all my scrap lumber and sheet goods into and they take up a decent amount of room in the shop. So I decided to try and fit all my scrap wood and sheet goods into 1 unit and alleviate some of the space that my current set up is taking up.I will be breaking this project into 4 sections and they are:PHASE 1 : Building the Vertical Storage UnitPHASE 2: Building the Central Storage SectionPHASE 3: The Base, Front & Cart BackPHASE 4: Cart AssemblyRESEARCH & DESIGNI wish I could claim credit for this design but I was not the one who designed it. I came across this project on Pinterest and the original design came from DIY Montreal, you can find her website in the link and she also has free project plans to help make it. She also documented a project video on YouTube and you can watch it HERE.HERE..MATERIALS NEEDED
This project requires the following materials in order to make the cart. Ask the home center to break down the 2 big plywood sheets, they are available in both sets of plans.Qty 2 – Full sheets of 3/4 plywoodQty 4 – 3 CastersWood Glue1-1/4 wood screws1-1/4 pocket hole screws#12 3/4 Hex Head Slotted Sheet Metal Screws (I use these to secure the casters to the base)PHASE 1Vertical Shelving UnitThe vertical storage sections is basically made up with 2 sides and 4 shelves, the shelves are secured with glue and screws into the dado's that were cut using a dado stack installed into my tablesawHere is the completed shelving unit
Dado joints secure the shelves into the sidesPHASE 2 – CENTER BIN STORAGEThe second phase of the scrap wood storage cart dals with the central storage option. This is basically a bunch of cubbies that I plan on standing lumber in vertically.
The storage unit basically has 2 sides and 4 cubbies . The sides of the cubbies is angled from the back to the front.Breaking Down the plywood sheet into the sides of the unit, using my circular saw and straight edgeUsed my plunge router with a dado jig to cut the dado joints that will secure the dividersCut the dividers to final dimensionsCenter Cubby Storage all completePHASE 3 – The Back, Base and FrontPhase 3 deals with the cart Base, Front and Back. This section is the final section where I will be cutting the final components of the cart before I start my assembly.Here are the tasks that I completed in this section:The Base and CastersThe Back and Pocket HolesThe FrontTHE BASE & CASTER WHEELS
The base is pretty basic stuff but its role in the cart is crucial. The base is what all the other components that I made sit on, so it needs to cut to the exact size in order for everything to fit on it. As far as skill needed to create the base its very basic stuff but here is the order of events that went into prepping it.Here is the underside of the base with the caster wheels all secured.THE BACKThe back of the cart is basically a plywood panel that is secured on the back edge of the base, this panel defines the sheet goods storage space that I am building into the cart. In hindsight I wish this space was wider, because at 6 deep it really doesn't cater to storing that much storage space, but anyway hindsight is a beautiful thing. The panel is basically a quarter sheet of plywood with pocket holes all the way along the long edge so as that it can be screwed into the base of the cart, I also positioned pocket holes on the back edge so as that I can secure the panel into the vertical shelving rack I built in phase 1.Here is the back with all the pocket holes cut so as to attach the bac to the cart bottom and vertical shelving unitTHE FRONTTHE FRONT
Basically the front is a long piece of plywood that is positioned on the front of the cart, as you can see in the image there is very little to it. I basically cut the panel to 48 x 6 wide. But what you don't really see is that I have drilled pocket holes into the back face of the plywood panel in order to secure into the base. Basically anything that is being secured into the base is pocket hole screwed with glue.ASSEMBLY TIMEThe assembly was done in the following sequence.Attached the vertical shelving unit to the baseAttached the back to the cartAttached the Central storage cubby unitAttached the front
Vertical Shelving Unit installed with glue and pocket screwsHere is the back getting attached to the base and shelving unit, I used clamps to keep the back alighned.Back installedMade some layout lines so I knew where to add glue.Finally secured the center storage unit with glue and pocket hole screws, all the pocket holes were added to hidden parts of the assembly. Although I have to say that I don't really like using pocket hole joinery they do have these conveniences and uses especially in shop furniture.The front is installed the same way as the rest of the project components using glue and pocket hole joinery.THATS IT ALL FINISHEDCome Visit my blog on my website and also get my version of the free project plans



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posted at: 12:06am on 18-May-2019
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Stickley/Douglas Inspired Dining Table

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(from Lumberjocks.com)


Stickley/Douglas Inspired Dining TableWhen my wife decided that she wanted a round dining table that would seat 6, I took it as a chance to learn some new skills. I love Stickley pieces, and after some internet research, I came across a blog written by fellow LJ, Douglas, who detailed his journey making a similar table. Using that and internet photos as a guide, I embarked on my first dining table adventure.The top is 56 in diameter, and is 7/8 thick. Using a biscuit joiner, I joined 12 or so boards to create the top. I struggled with the biscuit joiner at first and used some pocket holes to join a couple of separate pieces. Once I had the top glued up, I used the router and a shop made circle cutting jig to cut out the circle for the top. I chamfered the underside and rounded over the top.The legs and table base are all laminated pieces. I drew the shapes I wanted, and cut out using the bandsaw, and shaped with my spindle sander. I cut mortises in the legs to accept the base. I then half-lapped 2 boards that attached to the top of the base to serve as support for the top. I used predrilled and countersunk screws to attach the table to the base.I actually completed this build just before Thanksgiving, and haven't posted until now because I wanted to build the chairs for the table and post both projects in a short timeframe. Unfortunately, due to the length of time since the table was completed (actually had a run of paying customers!), I don't remember many of the smaller details. If you have any specific questions, please let me know, and I will be glad to attempt to answer them.Thanks for looking!



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posted at: 12:06am on 18-May-2019
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Hanging Compressor Project

I can't wait to show off my new compressed air setup.

I saw this pic in a magazine...



... and it got me to thinking.

I wanted a dedicated place to finally put my compressor in the shop...
  • while allowing it to be removed quickly to use away from the shop
  • without taking up valuable floor space
  • with an attached 5 gallon tank
  • with a connection to a retractable air hose reel
  • without screwing anything directly to the ceiling (to avoid puncturing the roof shingles, and inviting leaks)
  • and with a copper pipe manifold that has connections before and after an air filter


I ended up with all of these, and more.


Read part two here.



posted at: 6:56pm on 17-May-2019
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Hanging Compressor Project, Part 2

In the first post on this project, I said...

I wanted a dedicated place to finally put my compressor in the shop...
  • while allowing it to be removed quickly to use away from the shop
  • without taking up valuable floor space
  • with an attached 5 gallon tank
  • with a connection to a retractable air hose reel
  • without screwing anything directly to the ceiling (to avoid puncturing the roof shingles, and inviting leaks)
  • and with a copper pipe manifold that has connections before and after an air filter


Well, here's what I managed to put together...



Now I know it looks sort of busy, and part of that is due to my jam packed shop, but let me go through all the pieces that make up this total compressed air solution, that I am VERY happy with, and maybe when I'm done, it'll inspire you to do something similar.

Let's start with the compressor platform...





You can see the pivoting, 2" PVC coiled hose keeper that's mounted under the platform, and the T-fitting I replaced the compressor's release valve with, but more on those later.

Here's the platform before I hung it up, without anything on it...



I put cleats on three sides, and glued those small, angled cleats in place too.
The compressor's front foot rests in the half-circle drilled into the front cleat, and its back two feet rest in the half-circles drilled into those two angled back cleats.

All the cleats serve to keep the compressor in place, during any vibration while the compressor is running. As it turns out, there's actually very little vibration, and I think it's because the platform is hanging from chains, and that might dampen most of the vibration, along with the compressor's rubber feet.

The platform is hanging from the angled ceiling joists of my workshop, so it's pretty clear the stainless steel chains had to be shorter in the back than in the front, so as to level the platform.


Part 3 in a few days...



posted at: 6:55pm on 17-May-2019
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Ollie's Chest

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(from Lumberjocks.com)


Ollie's ChestWhen you have two grandsons, you have to make two chests. This one is Ollie's. He helped design it, choosing the lid profile and end panel shape. He decided it needed a till (with a secret compartment, shhh, don't tell anyone) and a lock with a key. He wanted it to be blue.I decided that he might lock the key inside the chest so I didn't install the lock catch. It's made out of poplar and finished with Salem Red milk paint followed by Federal Blue, followed by BLO and then some Briwax. I buff the milk paint out with 0000 steel wool to burnish it.The hardware was forged by Ian Hart with Cloven Hoof Iron and Wood. He made the nails, crab lock & key, and strap hinges.Ollie loved it. He literarily jumped for joy when I delivered it. My main issue is that he has a younger sister! I've tried to add a few things to projects I make for the grandkids but I don't think I can add anything else to a painted six board chest. I might have to upgrade to a dovetailed chest.



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posted at: 12:01am on 17-May-2019
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Cheese board with a dolphin and turtle "bowtie".

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Cheese board with a dolphin and turtle "bowtie".Hey guys and gals,
I have been working on this cheeseboard for a few weeks now mainly because the spalted section soaked up a lot more poly than the solid parts. The challenge for me was spraying thin coats, sanding and repeating the process until the spalted parts no longer soaked any more poly. I am thinking it took 12 layers to get it all even.
Anyways, the “mouth” appeared to look like an ocean wave and I used a turtle “bowtie” running away from the waves and a dolphin one jumping into it in an attempt to prevent cracks from expanding in those weak areas. They are cherry wood.
The wood was a broken branch of a spalted pecan tree that I bought locally and had it slicied to 1-1/2” slabs for $135. I really thought the whole thing was going to be used for smoke my fish and meat until I ran the slabs through the planer and saw all the beauty in the wood. Since then, I have made several pens from different chunks of that wood that turned out very well.
Thanks for looking.



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posted at: 12:01am on 17-May-2019
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Swamp kauri hei toki

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Swamp kauri hei tokiFinished with beeswax and boiled linseed. These days, toki are primarily worn for ornamental purposes. Traditionally, they were (and still are) made of pounamu (NZ greenstone) to represent the adze. Maori traditionally used pounamu to make a number of tools.



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posted at: 12:01am on 17-May-2019
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Antique copper pen.

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Antique copper pen.Hi,
I am away from home for three days (in day two) and after the meetings, sitting in a hotel room managed to put this video together. I forgot to wipe my lathe clean after spraying the chemicals on the copper and as you can see, I ended up with a patina lathe as well. You may also notice a bunch of paint on my fingers.
At the same time that I was making the pen, I did my first ever painting which can be seen as the background in the picture. Subsequent paintings produced disastrous results. Unfortunately, I didn't video the painting or document the process; oh, well!
Process.



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posted at: 12:00am on 16-May-2019
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Caboose

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CabooseHello fellow LumberJocks- Just finished the Toys and Joys caboose to go with the Stem Engine I recently completed. My son wanted it red so I just used a piece of scrap 2X6. I believe if your going to paint, don't waste oak or any other hardwood. I roughed sanded it to try to give it an aged look. As always all comments are welcome. Next up a freight car.



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posted at: 12:00am on 16-May-2019
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Thin strips on Festool CMS tablesaw jigs

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Thin strips on Festool CMS tablesaw jigsThin strips on Festool CMS tablesaw
jigsHere two thin strip jigs I made yesterday, specifically made for my Festool CMS table saw.They are made from standard aluminium profiles, these happens to fit the CMS, so I just cut into the profiles with the table saw and attached the ball bearings with bolts, that I sanded down in height of the heads.So simple and fast to make, just ball bearings, profiles, washers, bolts and nuts . ;-)You can see my other strip jigs, the thin strippers as I called them here: https://www.lumberjocks.com/mafe/blog/129568
Pictures:
1. Strip jig 1 on the Festool CMS table saw.
2. Top close up on version 1 ball bearing.
3. Side close up on version 1 ball bearing.
4. Strip jig 2 on the Festool CMS table saw.
5. Side close up on version 2 ball bearings.
6. Side close up on version 2 ball bearings.

Hope it can be to some inspiration, perhaps even a thin strip jig.Best thoughts,MaFe



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posted at: 12:00am on 16-May-2019
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Live Edge Walnut Table

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Live Edge Walnut TableI went to visit my Dad and a logger buddy, Brownie, of his was there visiting also. Eventually the talk turned to woodworking. I mentioned that was looking for walnut crotch for a chest of drawers project. Brownie told me of a piece of wood that he had been hoarding for six years but he might be willing part with. After seeing the pictures he sent me, I saw it didn't have the feather crotch I was looking for but it looked like the grain had lots of figure.I told my wife that it looked like a table top to me and if she wanted it for a table, I'd make it for her but that I didn't think I would buy it for my chest project since it wasn't just what I wanted. We made arrangements to go look at the slab. My wife was supposed to give me a discreet head nod if she wanted it.Brownie poured water on the slab and the grain came alive. A glance to my wife and her head stretched as far up and down as anyone has ever nodded. A quick negotiation and I had a table top to make.The base was hand forged by Ian Hart of Cloven Hoof Iron and Wood in Virginia. His work is amazing. He patiently worked through the design process with me and the end result is exactly what I wanted & what he had drawn. Plus Ian kindly delivered it to me since I was recovering from a knee replacement surgery. I think the base really makes the table.Finished with BLO hand rubbed, black epoxy for the couple narrow cracks, bow ties on the bottom to stabilize the cracks, 5' 6 long, 28 at the waist, 30 & 33 at the ends, 30 tall.



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posted at: 12:00am on 15-May-2019
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Motley Poplar Asian Sawhorse

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Motley Poplar Asian SawhorseFinally posting instead of lurking. Thanks to all the LJs who kept up my interest in wood during my last few years of work. I built these to upgrade from those flimsy plastic sawhorses that cost $10 but are worth $5. I followed plans of Len Cullum at makezine.com. Inspired also by Richard McGuire and Chris Schwartz.Poplar is about as strong as balsa wood, but they are about 3 inches thick and should hold up. They could take my weight before any glue or pegs. Mostly power tool construction but lots of hand planing, including whittling the walnut 1/2 inch pegs with a plane. Draw-boring is harder than it looks. Now I can start on a baby Roubo workbench to move more in a hand tool direction. My pile of oak is waiting. Cheers.Paxjen, Maryland



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posted at: 12:00am on 15-May-2019
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Key West paintings on found wood

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Key West paintings on found woodKey West paintings on found wood treated with clear epoxy.



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posted at: 12:00am on 15-May-2019
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Veterans Jewelry Box

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Veterans Jewelry BoxI have been wanting to make this for my friend Bill for a long long time. A Veteran of Vietnam as an Air Force medic, I wanted to honor him for his faithful service during a very trying and dangerous time.However, sourcing the medallions was the long pole in this tent. These metal/brass/porcelain medallions and plaques are of superb quality, but are no longer made. So finding NOS items are extremely difficult. And finding an Air Force set was near impossible. A year after starting the search, one popped up in Alaska and I was able to complete the box.The wood is curly black walnut, grain matched around the corners, even the removable tray. The tray and box are felt lined and the tray has a ring holder. Finished with tung oil and several coats of hard paste wax.I will have the pleasure of presenting it to him day after tomorrow....rookieII



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posted at: 12:00am on 14-May-2019
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Fractal Burned Pecan Shoehorn

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Fractal Burned Pecan ShoehornThis is a shoehorn shaft I turned in Arizona and I ran out of kits so I brought it home. I wanted to see what one would like with the Lichtenburg Fractal figures all down it so I burned it and inlaid it with turquoise paint.it is finished with semi gloss lacquer.Cheers, Jim



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posted at: 12:00am on 14-May-2019
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Navy Paddle Plaque

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Navy Paddle PlaqueA fun little project for my daughter. She is separating from the Navy and wanted a plaque to commemorate the event with a fun paddle plaque.Mahogany for the face, walnut accent and oak for the handle. Wrapped in Navy blue colored para-cord. Tung oil with spray on lacquer finish. A little under 3 feet tall.Custom cnc patterns.



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posted at: 12:00am on 13-May-2019
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A Small Bowl

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A Small BowlThis, I thought, was my last bit of Jacaranda. I was wrong. For I climbed up the shelf and found, to my amazement, that there are a few sticks left. Very skinny sticks. I'm not even sure they're fat enough to make goblets. And Jacaranda's nowhere near hard enough to made a tool handle of it. In any case, this was the last little chunk of it I had.Make note of the lower left photo. You see the shape of a sideways pomegranate? I knew there would be something fascinating behind that. I was right. A repeat of Gallery photo #1 shows it. The appearance of the figure folding in on itself like a couple of sand dunes is what I'm talking about, of course. And the chatoyance is stunning, in motion. That's the “money shot.”The wondrous thing, the perplexing thing, about this Jacaranda is that it seems to be the only wood among all the orphaned tree pieces I've collected that hasn't cracked. Nor does this piece seem to have any pith to speak of. Wonderful stuff, this Jacaranda. I want more.I made some photos on the lathe, in case I screwed it up.I made one more photo, of the bottom. I'll keep it this way til I decide whether to put a plug in it or make some kind of stand for the bowl.It's very small (not as small as the Things you've been treated to, lately). It's about 3” tall. I finished this with BLO/Shellac.Thank you. And, I apologize.



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posted at: 12:00am on 13-May-2019
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Black bear Ash stump

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Black bear Ash stumpCarved this black bear for Boulder Crest Retreat for veterans and recovering troops. Was a blast carving. Some very admirable gentlemen came down and watched as I carved. I was nervous at first but such great people made it so much easier!!



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posted at: 12:00am on 13-May-2019
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Modern twin beds

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Modern twin bedsI recently made two twin beds for a client. Construction was a simple 5/8” plywood box beam frame that was skinned with 1/2” alder (sides and bottom) and 3/4 alder (top). The client originally wanted 6 X 6 walnut but that was out of the question due to cost and availability. I was able to miter the outside corners of the 1/2” alder on the foot of the bed and the 3/4” alder top. The headboard, a simple removable plywood box, will be upholstered by the client. It covers the joints at the head of the bed so miters were not required. The 3/8” baltic birch slats fit in groves on the inside of the frame and are center supported by a beam made of 5/8” plywood with 3/4” alder sides and spacers that provide notches to keep the slats from moving. It will be stained a dark walnut my staining professionals. The final step will be the installation of large industrial 6” diameter locking casters. Not my idea.



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posted at: 12:00am on 12-May-2019
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Sungka Board Fever Mk II

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Sungka Board Fever Mk IIOK this is the final episode of the Sungka board production as far as I am concerned.
As you would be aware if you were following the antics of myself and anthm27 we have both been busy making these game boards.I started these three in April and have only just managed to finish them.
Most of the time was taken up with me experimenting with work processes and buying tools I never used in the end to achive the results you see here.The Timber.
The Timber is Australian Swamp Gum or AKA River Gum some stock courtesy of LLWW or AKA degoose.
Sadlythe plank of timber I chose had quite a few defects in it and replicated through the timber to each individual board, but as I wanted to develop a work method to produce them as my wife friends kept ordering more each visit I continued on regardless to completion.One of the boards is subject to a blog if your interested further.Work Process.
The plank I used was 3m in length so I docked three pieces out of it suitable for the boards
I then ripped the three down to about 28mm and set to work.
Initally I used a modified roundover bit in a hand held router and the template at picture four.template
This produced the board in the middle.
As this way too long to route out I set out to reduce the milling time from about 2 hours to about 30minutes.
I achieved this time reduction by using an Arbortech Mini planer.
The results are the fish and truck board.Once all the carving and shaping were completed I used my favorite girl to assist with the sanding, she sanded everything to 600 Grit, I had a picture of her but somebody pinched her while she was at the New store helping out there.the boards were then friction polished to achieve the finish seen in the pictures.I dont have any action shots of the boards in use but if LBD decides to fly North for the winter I may get him and I active with a game and then I can post some pictures of the odd couple or two grumpy old men playing.Thats it from me for the time being hope I didnt bore you too much.



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posted at: 12:00am on 12-May-2019
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Rehab Your Old Swing

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Rehab Your Old SwingWith the price of things today, I enjoy bringing things back to life that other people would throw away. This swing was originally built with fabric to support the cushions. Of course, the fabric eventually dry rotted. I just cut some ripped 2×4's and fastened them just a hair higher than the frame. Had a friend give me some 15 year old “barn find” pine. Planed to desired thickness, ripped to desired width, and coated with water seal. 5 minutes of finish nail gun fastening, and your ready to drink some sweet tea and watch the sun go down.I think the gray streaks in the wood indicate a “beetle kill tree” but somebody can check me on that.



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posted at: 12:00am on 12-May-2019
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Plane-making tools box

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Plane-making tools boxI built a box to hold my plane-making tools (floats, brace and bits, and circle templates). It holds all the tools securely, including the box of my gimlet drill bits and nothing rattles around.It's built of 3/4 pine which my sweetie salvaged from some shelves she no longer needed, plus some beech scraps for the dust seal. The hardware is brass from Ace Hardware and set me back less than $20. The box is glued and nailed together, using cut nails from Brooklyn Tool & Craft.The inserts to hold the floats are pieces of a construction grade 2×6 I had laying in the shop. I sawed and chiseled recesses to hold the floats by hand. The floats with their handles to the left cut on the push stroke, and the handles on the right cut on the pull.Finish is linseed oil and a couple coats of shellac. The plane carved in the lid is my first bit of artistic carving. Not great, but not horrible for a first attempt, I guess. The letters on the front are carved and filled with black wood filler.



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posted at: 12:00am on 11-May-2019
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Display Rack for Track Medals....with a twist....

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Display Rack for Track Medals....with a twist....My daughter had track medals on the mirror, around the bed post, etc. We needed a place to put them. The cool thing about this project is that I took a picture of her crossing the finish line, downloaded the picture into a drawing program, outlined her silhouette, plotted the drawing on an E sized sheet, then traced the the silhouette on some cabinet grade thin plywood. Her silhouette is now part of the design. Recorded in emphany and created a place to store the medals. Holds about 100. Maybe some of you can translate it to other sports as well.



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posted at: 12:00am on 11-May-2019
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Portable Assembly Table for B&D Workmate

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Portable Assembly Table for B&D WorkmateThis is my first post to Lumberjocks. I've been a longtime reader and looker, but just never bothered to register. Just thought I'd contribute something rather than just looking at all the amazing projects people post here.I have a list of projects coming up that will greatly benefit from having an assembly table to help keep them square during glue-up (e.g., shop cabinets, picture frames, shadow boxes, etc.). Since I don't really have room to dedicate to a permanent assembly table, I designed this small, portable table to use with a B&D Workmate and made several accessories for it. I'm really happy with how it came out!If you're interested in greater detail, I've included a few videos showing the full construction details below.Part 1. https://youtu.be/Um5kzkli00M (the table)
Part 2. https://youtu.be/AlBStRtlWZU (T-track clamps)
Part 3. https://youtu.be/aYh992zQU0A (dogs and wedges)



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posted at: 12:00am on 11-May-2019
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32 Ford

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32 FordA friend at work asked me to make a 32 Ford model for his dad, not the greatest lookin but seeing how the year is older than I am I can”t complain, his dad has a “duce rodster” and he wanted to give him a model of it. the supplier of the plans says it takes about 70 hours to make each one , but I will admit that I am way over that number of hours for each one..



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posted at: 12:00am on 10-May-2019
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Bathroom Wall Cabinet

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Bathroom Wall CabinetAfter completing our bathroom vanity earlier this year, I made a wall cabinet to match. I originally planned to have the mirror on the outside of the cabinet with the door hinged on the right so I could see into the mirror on the opposite wall for fixing the back of my hair. Thankfully, I have a very wise and helpful husband who suggested that I place the mirror inside so the door opening would make access to the inside easier. Dah! Why didn't I think of that!The mirror is held in place with little plastic mirror holders from which I cut the offset. I ended up having to pad it with felt so the mirror wouldn't rattle. I had initially planned to cut a broken thick mirror but realized it would weigh too much for the tiny hinges with the added weight of the raised panel; hence, the mounting adjustments.The horizontal parts hold the cabinet together with sliding dovetails.The crown molding is made up of a leftover piece of molding I had made for picture frames and a bullnose piece added at a 22.5-degree angle.
The knob is a larger version of the vanity pullout knobs. It's too big but I didn't want to pay $12.69 to get the right one (knob = $2.70; postage $9.99). [I should probably just order $50 worth of merchandise and get the free shipping!]
The towel bar is a vinyl-coated closet rod. [I won't make the mistake again of using a wooden dowel to hold anything that gets wet!]
And here are a couple pictures of another wall cabinet that I made a few years ago as a 50th anniversary gift.Comments and questions are always appreciated.L/W



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posted at: 12:00am on 10-May-2019
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Tablesaw Outfeed Table

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Tablesaw Outfeed TableI built this Outfeed Table for my SawStop tablesaw. It is based on a plan that I found in a February 2009 edition of Woodworkers Journal. Needless to say it was not designed for a SawStop saw, but fit very nicely on the saw with a few alterations.The outfeed table is designed to fold down in front of the saw when not in use. The core is made from a couple sandwiched pieces of .75” MDF, and topped with a single color (white) laminate. The collaspe of the table is accomplished from the extension piece sliding into the base of the 'leg'. It is secured in the base using a single bolt latch.The outfeed table dimensions are 44” x 28.25”.



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posted at: 12:00am on 10-May-2019
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Sanding Blocks

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Sanding BlocksI'm always reaching for a sanding block. I like the idea of a flat hard wood block so I can keep what I am sanding flat and not round over corners so easily. I came across this video on Youtube and really liked the idea of using sanding belts. The sanding belts last a long time, they sand smooth and flat, and they take a lot of abuse. I built them according to the video except that I didn't shim the wedges. I cut several thicknesses of wedges until I settled on the right size so I didn't have to shim any of them. I ordered a variety of grits off Amazon. (3” X 21” belts) I love these sanding blocks.Youtube video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qxvfIw84i-Y&t=1098sSanding Belts: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07H1BK388/ref=ppxyodtbsearchasintitle?ie=UTF8&psc=1



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posted at: 12:00am on 09-May-2019
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First pen - sapele and ebony

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First pen - sapele and ebonyI am not really a pen turner but thought I'd give it a try. This is actually a pencil, not a pen. Made from sapele and ebony. Finish is shellac topped off with paste wax.



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posted at: 12:00am on 09-May-2019
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Cam Clamps

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Cam ClampsLast Saturday, LJ Kposty and I went to the Great Lakes Woodworking Festival in Adrian, Michigan. They had a lot of demonstrations, vendor booths and hands on use of woodworking tools for beginners. In the tool building, Lie Nielsen had a booth with all their tools and one of them was a cam clamp. I could see a use for it because I always need a clamp with a deeper throat for glue ups and these can be made to most any dimension as long as the material will take the load. I made a sketch and came home and made two styles.The first one is a one piece body made from Osage Orange and with an aluminum bar with a brass stop in the end of it. I cut the slot for the cam with a router bit in the mill and cut the slots for the bar with the scroll saw and found that blade was not in good shape and it made a couple ugly holes… but I made them work. It is slightly mis-alligned but it clamps just fine. It has a 6” throat and clamps up to 8” wide. I used 1/8” roll pins to hold the bar in , for the cam pivot and at both sides of the bar slot for a bearing for the bar and to keep the wood from splitting. Lie Nielsen did the same.The second one is made from cherry ( just because I had a couple pieces of 3/8” cherry already planed and waiting to be a clamp!! It is a 3 piece body and I like this one better because it is easy to make and I may take the plan to school for a shop project next fall. It is also an 8 ” clamp with a 6” throat. I see the roll pins dent the cherry pretty easily but it holds in any position.The bodies are 1 1/8” x 1 1/2” by 8 1/4” long. The aluminum bar is 1/4” x1 1/8” The cherry bar is 3/8” x 1 1/4”Cheers, Jim



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posted at: 12:00am on 09-May-2019
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Dewalt planer dust collection cabinet

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Dewalt planer dust collection cabinetIt's not always convenient to hook a large dust collection unit to all my tools. So, I built this cabinet after looking around on the web. Two drawers with a separating baffle in between make lighter weight emptying. It will require a little more work, as the chip ejection fan on this planer is so strong that it blows the drawers open just a little, allowing some sawdust to blow out.I think I'll try cutting a 4or 5 inch hole in the front and use a filter to ease the pressure without losing the sawdust.Anyone been through this? If you have, advice is appreciated.



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posted at: 12:00am on 08-May-2019
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Matching coffee & end tables

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Matching coffee & end tablesMatching coffee and end table for our living room
Curly tiger maple with wormy maple tops and legs
Book-matched the tops.
Dyed with antique cherry brown water based dye.
I used Charles Neil's blotch control.
Arm-r-Seal poly finish



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posted at: 12:00am on 08-May-2019
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Lady In Red

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Lady In RedI was asked if I could make a last minute box to be given as a gift.
The catch was that I only had 24 hours to design and build it.
I like a challenge so I dropped everything and got to work.
The customer was wanting something pretty simple, and no dividers, so I scratched my head and came up with this.
I barely delivered it in time….whew!The sides are a very dark White Oak
The lid is from one piece of quilted Western Maple
The handle is Paduak
The feet are walnut with a Paduak rail, this can be seen in photo 4
The lining is Buffalo hide
Brass pins were used for hinges
Finish is semi-gloss LacquerThanks for looking!



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posted at: 12:00am on 08-May-2019
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quick and dirty farmhouse coffee table

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quick and dirty farmhouse coffee tableMy wife wanted a coffee table a little bit bigger and a lot less… cheap than our $20, 10-year old, rickety IKEA table. I've had it on the list for a long time, but we had something that worked so it wasn't a priority. That is, until she couldn't take it anymore and promised I could make a “good” one later if I could just make something quick that would better suit our needs right now. I agreed, but I didn't get it in writing… The result is the table you see here.She loves the Joanna Gaines farmhouse style, so I did some quick internet searching and put together this design based on a number of different ones I've seen online, probably mostly Ana White, but a couple others too. Size was dictated by 1) space and 2) preference. Otherwise, here are a few design decisions I made.1) My goal on this project was speed. Quick and dirty. Easy joinery – pocket holes. Simple design – frame and tops. Simple materials – all 2×6 from home depot; I actually wanted pine for the “rustic” qualities it brings to the style with age. The kids are doing a wonderful job accelerating the natural patina timeframe :D.2) I made the x-bracing two complete, separate pieces. All the designs I found online had one functional angled piece and the other was chopped in two and brad nailed on. This thing wasn't coming apart any time soon, but I didn't want to sacrifice quality/ strength when leaving them whole and offset would be just as easy and stronger, so that's what I did there. I originally wanted to do half-laps on these to put them in the same plane, but it went against the quick and dirty approach I wanted here.3) I tongue-and-grooved the tops because I just can't leave well enough alone. Had I the time, I would have done breadboard ends, but way too complex for this project. I couldn't glue the tops together because I didn't want to account for wood movement when attaching the top to the frame. I didn't like the deck-board look where you could see through gaps between each board if I screwed them down and left room for movement between them. So, I did tongue-and-groove and screwed each board down in the center. There is room for expansion and contraction between each board and it looks like one solid piece (you can't see between the boards). Yes the grooves attract crumbs, etc, but it's easy enough to vacuum out IMO.In the end, this construction lumber really is terrible. It felt pretty dry but alas was nowhere near it. I'd have been pretty upset on any other project, but it fit the bill for this one. I actually like how it made the tops a little uneven here and there. But it was baaad…Also, leave it to me to screw up the easiest joint in the craft (facepalm)...I used a mix of sunbleached and weathered gray stain by Varathane and 3 coats of water based poly (GF high performance) for the tops, a coat of shellac primer and a couple coats of white paint for the frame.



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posted at: 12:00am on 07-May-2019
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Raiseed bed planter

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Raiseed bed planterI have not been on vacation.Building raised bed planters and yard benches.All made from mostly—”rescued” lumber; some from all RESCUED materials.Still a lot of work and the cost of the screws is also higher than most realize.I build sturdy enough to easily support about 300 pounds. All cross braced and pilot holes drilled for the screws too. No nails used of any kind.



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posted at: 12:00am on 07-May-2019
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Time to try a few inlays

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Time to try a few inlaysThe first picture is canarywood over purpleheart with a crushed yellow marble. After cutting the grove for the inlay I painted it black because the CA is clear and it needed to be dark for contrast. I don't know if I'll use a marble again, I had glass shards in my fingers for days.The second picture is something I tried by using 2 pieces of 14-2 copper wire. I put one end of the 2 wires in a vise. I put the other end in my drill and spun the copper until it was wound tight. I hammered it flat and wrapped it around the ring. I had to use a dremel to remove parts of the links to make it look like it is a solid ring of copper. After I glued it in place I put it back on the lathe and sanded the copper down to be flush with the wood. I'm pretty sure I won't be making another one like this. It's not worth the time it takes to get this right.The next photo is cherry and walnut with some random stone I picked up outside and crushed to use as an inlay. I mixed the stone with some glow powder. The powder is supposed to glow for 4-8 hours.The last photo is the same ring with the lights off.



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posted at: 12:00am on 07-May-2019
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Bandsaw Stand

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Bandsaw StandI made a plywood stand for my bandsaw. There is space to store the extra blades.
Added some dust collection while I was at it.



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posted at: 12:00am on 06-May-2019
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stickley inspired cherry side table

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stickley inspired cherry side tablehere is a picture of a Stickley inspired cherry and spalted maple end tables I was asked to make for my mom the picture only shows 1 table but I made a marching set the tables are a full 1 inch thick of solid cherry and spalted maple I learned to use a circle cutting jig for the router and used red epoxy to fill splits I tried to show much of the construction process as I could the legs are laminated white oak n blood wood and a Danish oil finish these tables would not have been possible with out the help of my friend and his more equip shop they gave me quite a lot of challenges but I,m very proud of how they came out hope you enjoy



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posted at: 12:00am on 06-May-2019
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CD Boxes

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CD BoxesI made 11 of these CD/DVD boxes for Christmas Presents for each of our Grandkids. No two are alike as far as wood species used and they have sliding tops. The boxes are made out of boards from logs I sawed and air dried over the years and I have to give my wife credit for the finish on them.



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posted at: 12:00am on 06-May-2019
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Lane cedar chest refurb

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Lane cedar chest refurbI wish I had a before picture…looked like it was right out of country furnishing store from the 80's. Donated by a neighbor that thought I could make it usable again. The cedar interior was in great shape but the rest was a disaster. Fully new exterior, new legs, cabinet paint on top, and kid safe hinges. Now a proper home for the kids school backpacks! (Hand painted initials of my boys on lid top). Maybe this will inspire you with a similar project?



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posted at: 12:00am on 05-May-2019
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moving thread sale walls

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moving thread sale wallsMOVING SALES WALLS
Rolling barn door hardware was used to allow the forward wall to slide over shop walls. Wheels were place on the bottom of the wall and roll on the existing wall molding. Barn door hardware was offset to make wall hang against the shop walls.



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posted at: 12:00am on 05-May-2019
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MCM end table

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MCM end tableAs you can see…already collecting junk after a week…lol. Hard maple with Purple Heart between the miter edges…and yes…it was intentional design choice to have the Purple Heart protrude out. Hairpin legs from a Detroit shop that custom makes them…really nice quality. Leg feet from rockler…which work really well. Danish oil and wax.



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posted at: 12:00am on 05-May-2019
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Model Train Shelf

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Model Train ShelfMade these shelves to display G scale model trains for a guy. I made 5- 48” wide and 2- 36” wide.
Truss parts are made from poplar and the shelf is alder. Used air assisted spray can lacquer for the finish.



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posted at: 2:00pm on 04-May-2019
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Bedside Table #2

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Bedside Table #2This is the second table produced for our new bedroom set of furniture. This post includes the hardware already attached (first table posted did not ) and I included an upgrade of over-travel drawer glides. Also, this table is slightly larger as the top is 16”x 24” instead of the other one which was 14”x 24”. Since this one will be on my wife's side of the bed, I figured she would need more room for stuff than I would. Funny how changing 1 measurement to the top piece has a trickle down effect and requires changing many, many more measurements to the aprons, spindle spacing, bottom shelf, etc.Assembly is mostly mortise and tenon style with dowel rod pins for added stability (shown in picture 3). I love the draw-boring technique because it requires very little (if any) glue, and makes me feel like a old school craftsman. Funny, coming from and guy who embraces new technology like laser engravers and CNC machines.The last picture shows its final location, and the area that I am considering using making a headboard for out of this Wormy Chestnut that I recently came across. I'm on the fence about using it because I'm not sure if it will look like a cool accent/focal piece, or just look awkwardly out of place. I would only have enough to do the headboard, and the rest of the bed frame would be filled in with oak. I'm thinking the grain looks very similar, but the color would definitely be darker due to the age of the wood.Thanks for looking, as always comments welcome and questions answered!



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posted at: 11:57am on 04-May-2019
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Pen Display for Dad

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Pen Display for DadFor Christmas I made my dad this 5-piece Pen Set and didn't have enough time leftover to make a case for them. His birthday is on Monday, and he will be turning the big seven-oh (70), so I took some time to put this together for him. I have a hard time getting him presents because he never wants to use gifts or replace anything he has. For example, my sister brought him home some candy from the middle east 14 years ago, and he still hasn't eaten it because he doesn't want to ruin the wrapper. So being that I am a home made gift giver, this seemed like a good idea.Full disclosure, I purchased the blank acrylic as a set from Rockler , which made the build go a lot quicker. However, I wanted to personalize it so I engraved the pieces before assembly with his name on top (Rocco L. Santucci) and the phrase on the bottom “Thanks for helping me write the story of my life”. I don't think that's a famous quote or anything, but given the application, I thought it to be a fitting phrase. I know that sometimes engraving on acrylic or glass can produce a “shadow” effect, so I had to mirror the text on the bottom and engraved the underside of the bottom piece to avoid that. I tried to show that in picture #3, but i'm not sure if you can see it or not.After engraving each piece, I assembled it and locked the screws in with some CA glue. I had to drill and countersink the mounting holes to be able to attach it to the piece of walnut, which in hindsight I should have done before assembly as I bumped the top piece with the chuck of my drill press (oops) and it left a mark.The last picture shows the old man in all his glory, at the Pirates game from last night. The Pirates are a terribly professional sports franchise, but going to the park to see a game is one of his favorite things to do. I have probably been to over a hundred Pirates games in my life and never once caught a homerun ball or a foul ball. Well last night we got crushed by the A's, but I caught not 1, but 2 foul balls and was able to give him an early birthday present.Thanks for stopping in and looking, and as always comments are welcome



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posted at: 11:41am on 04-May-2019
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walnut etargere

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walnut etargereI made this walnut and maple etagere shelf unit earlier this year for the upcoming show season. upper and Lower cabinet are made with domino reinforced miters . Pin latch and inlay are maple. Integrated handle on the upper drawer box was done on tablesaw similar to how you would make cove moulding. This piece will debut next weekend (May 11,12) in Bethesda MD at the Bethesda fine arts festival.



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posted at: 11:41am on 04-May-2019
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Mid century style serving tray

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Mid century style serving trayMCM style serving tray from scrap walnut. Hand painted and sanded recklessly for used look. The truly vintage brass drawer pulls were the only cost. Ready for a t.v. dinner?



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posted at: 2:36am on 04-May-2019
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My new bowl pattern for scroll saw

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(from Lumberjocks.com)


My new bowl pattern for scroll sawMy newest bowl pattern
I love making them
You can find pattern here
https://www.etsy.com/egwoodmade/listing/689742718
recommended size is 21*21 cm



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posted at: 1:30am on 04-May-2019
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Medium Maloof Chairs

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Medium Maloof ChairsI am not sure what happend to posting my Medium Maloof chairs, I made them in Mar Apr 2017 but it seems I never posted the finished items as a project.
Medium being able to seat an adult or a child but not being suitable to sit at a dining table with them.
I didnt realise until today when I went to comment on Bob Kassemeyer's Rocking Chair.So here they are most of the information relating to the construction is contained within the blog.So where are they today?
2x have gone to Grandkids in Menai Sydney NSW.
1x Is still sitting on our verandah awaiting collection from my wifes friend Estela who created all this work for me!
1 x I have stashed away, nobody is getting their hands on it, .... I am gunna sit on it



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posted at: 12:01am on 04-May-2019
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Applewood Gift Boxes

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Applewood Gift  BoxesDuring the winter of 2017 I had a coworker bring me some apple logs from his moms yard that went down during a bad wind storm. This is the first time I ever had logs processed into boards. When I got the kiln dried logs back there was quite a bit of twist & cupping in the boards.The saving grace is that I plan on using the applewood for smaller projects. I had to make a new taper jig and planer sled to get the apple into usable shape. After machining into the final dimensions and letting them set I had to hit all the edge miters a second time with my Lie-Nielsen #62 LA.I personalized the boxes with names and college mascots. One was for a 40th birthday present the other was a going away gift. The natural voids were filled with diamond dust epoxy. I finished with one coat GF seal-a-cell and multiple coats of arm-r-seal.Overall I am very happy with the character of the wood & the fact I was able to wrap the grain around all 4 corners. I have since read the apple is not the easiest to work with.Thanks for looking.Bill in MI



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posted at: 12:01am on 04-May-2019
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Secret Compartment Walnut Tissue Box

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Secret Compartment Walnut Tissue Box I was looking for some walnut with a crack or knot in it so I could add some turquoise stone and glow in the dark granules in the void. I found this slab with a knot at the Woodcraft store for 2 buck a pound. I bought a few pieces and made this tissue box with it. Some of the walnut was a lighter sap wood but I used it anyway.
This box has my internal safety latch and the secret compartment is made of maple and lined with felt.
.
To see how the safety latch works check out my YouTube video a previous box I made.I had my wife turn of the shop lights so we could see how the glow stone looked. It's hard to see in this video gif but it did look very cool in the shop!
Hope you like it!
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posted at: 12:01am on 04-May-2019
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Kitchen Cart

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Kitchen CartI'm a photographer and was asked to get a kitchen cart by my food stylist., So being a woodworker, of course I built one. It's made from walnut and maple. There are a couple of ways to make the edge grain top and shelves. My approach was to glue up the walnut center sections first, trim to size, and then add the 2 maple end strips. After they dried, they were trimmed off flush and the 2 maple side strips were added. Process repeated until the final length and width were reached.The frame was much simpler, consisting of just 2 end sections consisting of 2 vertical legs and 3 cross braces each. I debated adding braces that ran the length of the cart, but given the thickness of the shelves, I thought they were not necessary. I was right, and the result is a bit more room to access the shelves.I assembled the frame with my newest acquisition in tools, the Dowelmax. I am sold on this method of joinery, as long as exposed joinery is not part of the design. The Dowelmax produces joints very quickly, that are very strong and precise. I have no affiliation with them, I just appreciate a very well made tool that delivers as promised.I struggled a bit with the finish. I wanted something that brought out the richness of the walnut, but didn't yellow the maple too much. After doing lots of reading online, I tested 3 different finishes on scraps; Minwax WipeOn Poly, Formsby Tung Oil finish (not real Tung Oil I think), and Watco Danish Oil finish. The Minwax WipeOn Poly was discounted immediately, providing almost no richness to the Walnut. The other 2 did provide that richness, but also yellowed the maple. I decided that I could live with that, and used the Watco.I followed the directions to the letter; flood on a coat, wait 15 minutes, flood on another coat, wait 15 minutes, and wipe off the excess. It was supposed to dry overnight, but took about 6 days! Even then it was still a bit tacky. And while my tests looked good on my scraps, I didn't like the uneven shine on the edge grain, which runs in different directions. After some deliberation, I sanded off much of the finish with 220 grit sandpaper. This knocked down the sheen to a matte finish, and removed a lot of the yellow cast in the maple. The walnut lost some richness, but not too much. And when I followed this up with 2 coats of paste wax, I got a result that I liked.I would love to hear some recommendations on finishing maple and walnut projects from some of the experts here, who are far more experienced than me. Thanks!



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posted at: 12:00am on 03-May-2019
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Curly maple pen with ink transfer logo

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Curly maple pen with ink transfer logoCurly maple pen with ink transfer logo.



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posted at: 12:00am on 03-May-2019
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Rolling drill press cabinet

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Rolling drill press cabinetI wanted everything on wheels. I also want to maximize space. So I built this little rolling cabinet for my bench top drill press. It's 22 by 16. Made from what's sold as UV Maple plywood. Drawers are made from Baltic Birch 1/2 plywood. 22 inch drawer slides. This was also a skill building exercise. I used pen and paper to draw it out.Sorry for the sideways pictures. I can't figure out how to get them straight.



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posted at: 12:00am on 03-May-2019
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Parota Live Edge Slab Dining Table

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Parota Live Edge Slab Dining TableWe were moving into a new house and needed a new dining table so I decided to make one. I found this amazing Parota slab at a local wood shop and knew it would be great. It's 8' long x 45 wide and 2 thick. I finished it with Waterlox to harden and waterproof it for everyday use. The base is 2×4 steel tube I painted with spray on truck bed liner.I had a lot of fun with this project including finding out how irritating Parota dust is.Overall, I'm really happy with the way it turned out and we hopefully will get a ton of use out of it.



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posted at: 12:00am on 02-May-2019
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Viking Chess

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Viking ChessCarved from local woods- manzanita and Western live oak, inspired by the ancient Lewis chessmen.



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posted at: 12:00am on 02-May-2019
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8 More Comfort Grip Pens

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8 More Comfort Grip PensWell I let the elves in the barn with the wood furnace running and here is what they did. They made pens out of the 8 comfort grip pens kits that were left!!I used samples of the various woods I had in the wood room to see what wood will look the best on pens.
They are from left to right:
Birds eye maple, purple heart, red box elder, hard maple burl, teak, yin and yang walnut and maple, regular box elder and acacia with a small fractal burned pattern on it. They are all finished with EEE and Shellawax.One problem I had with the EEE was that the rag would slide onto the brass spacer bushing and get black and deposit that onto the wood. I could not get it all off because the bushing were already sanded down to size.
So I thought I'd make the bushings out of a material that did not turn black when polished with EEE. I made a complete set of Delrin bushings and I'll try them out tomorrow with EEE. They should work good with CA glue too because just about nothing sticks to that slippery Delrin.
This is my little tool set I use in the drill press to press all the parts together. I stand the tube on the small peg and it holds it vertical for good alignment under the top arbor with the three diameters on it.
cheers, Jim



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posted at: 12:00am on 02-May-2019
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Wall Mounted Magnetic Knife Holder

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(from Lumberjocks.com)


Wall Mounted Magnetic Knife HolderI have a variety of knives that I kept in the top shelf of a cabinet. BTW – that's not a good place to keep knives as I probably came close to going to the hospital on two separate occasions as taking out one knife sometimes “drags” a second knife out with it.My wife likes the counter-top in the kitchen to be clear, so I didn't want to have another standard knife block on it. I wanted to do a magnetic knife holder that sat back on the wall, yet the knife handles would be proud of the counter-top back splash and make it easier to grab onto the handles. I wasn't sure how to install the magnets so they would be strong enough to hold the knives. I thought about routing a channel for magnetic bars and then I stumbled across this video:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2rfNKOQTAEM&t=The YouTube video by Bork Wood was great, and I followed it pretty closely, except where he put in the E6000 to hold the magnets in place, I put in silicone adhesive. I also used Keyhole hangers, where as Bork Wood routed out the keyhole.https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01DMSXZEY/The other secret is to put the wood onto a metal sheet when installing/adhering the magnets in place, otherwise they will jump out at you and come together.I ordered my neodymium magnets from eBay – 1/2 inch diameter x 1/4 inch thick.https://www.ebay.com/itm/311529407772The knife block exceeded my expectations for holding the knives firmly. The key was after routing out the holes to the same depth, then running the top surface on a planer and getting the distance from the end of the magnet cavity to the top surface to be a hair over 1/16 of an inch. I used a dial caliper to get the depth measurement of the exterior dimensions of the wood and then compared it to the depth for the hole by using the rod that extends from the caliper and snuck up on the 1/16” difference at the planer.Note: this project wouldn't work as well with a drill press as the drill bit has an apex, while the router bit leaves a flat bottomed hole.Here are some extra pics of the project:
https://photos.app.goo.gl/XRb3mnG7GZiyKPyL9



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posted at: 12:00am on 01-May-2019
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Christmas ornament

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Christmas ornamentI turned this out of some scrap wood I found on the floor of my shop. Need some more practice, but I'm getting better.



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posted at: 12:00am on 01-May-2019
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Old deck wood birdhouse

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Old deck wood birdhouse“There, that ought to hold the little bastards.”
Some joinery, boatload of shot brads and type 3 glue. Just for the birds.
Salvaged Western Red Cedar



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posted at: 12:00am on 01-May-2019
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